You Are a Pickle

The reason it seems impossible for you to connect with investors and customers.

April 13, 2020

I admire the confidence of startup founders. Everyday, they get up and get after it in the hopes of doing something to change the world. It's inspiring. However, it's sad that most of them fail to see the obviously awesome things about themselves and their companies that would make them unforgettable. Instead, they try to focus on what they think people want them to be. It's an inauthentic approach to building a brand and it usually results in being labeled something they are not proud of. In time, they become something they fail to recognize.

I call it, "pickle syndrome."

Since they spend their lives in a jar, pickles have no idea what they look like from the outside. They also don't recognize the unique qualities that make them special either. They float in the jar hoping someone will recognize them and see their worth.

It's in moments like this that is pays to have an external voice chime in and tell you all of the things that make you and your startup significant. To give you a new label based on the obvious truths you take for granted.

You are still a pickle and you're freaking awesome at it. Don't be afraid to tell everyone.

More you say?

Measuring "Brand"

Yes, you can measure it. This is how.

4.29.2020

Since branding is an emotional subject, it gets hard to manage. Specifically, it gets hard to measure. Cue Marty Neumeier (again). In his book The Brand Flip he lays out a structure for measuring the effectiveness of building a brand in what has been called the Brand Ladder. The goal of the Brand Ladder is to see how well you are elevating a customer's experience with your company. If you score low, it means you're a commodity, easily capable of being replaced. If you score high, customers are likely to become repeat buyers, evangelists, and feel like they can't live without you.

Here is an outline of the scorecard (from your customer's point of view):

Satisfied Grade 1-5

__ The company/product has met my expectations.

__ The company charges a fair price for the product.

__ TOTAL (highest score of 10)

Delighted Grade 1-5 and multiply by 2

__ I've been pleasantly surprised by the company/product.

__ I would happily recommend it to others.

__ TOTAL x 2 (highest score of 20)

Engaged Grade 1-5 and multiply by 3

__ I identify well with the other customers of this company/product.

__ I would go out of my way for the company and its customers.

__ TOTAL x 3 (highest score of 30)

Empowered Grade 1-5 and multiply by 4

__ The company/product is essential to my life.

__ I would be very sorry if it went out of business.

__ TOTAL x 4 (highest score of 40)

__ Grand Total (Highest Score of 100)

But it doesn't end there. Like any other assessment, you have to dive deeper and unearth the reasons behind them. What is it about your company that affects these scores? Is it design? Is it your messaging? Is it the product? You can measure the effects of branding all day, but if you are not willing to check on the factors contributing to its success, you might as well not even bother. Sounds like something I should write about tomorrow...

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Band-Aid

This won't cure cancer and a logo won't save your startup.

6.10.2020

You would not prescribe a cancer patient to use a band-aid as appropriate treatment.

Likewise, it'd be stupid to prescribe a logo to fix a broken brand.

You have to be willing to undergo massive overhaul to make massive change. Dive deep into the fundamental flaws of your startup. Things like being aimless, having no defined culture, no spirit, a lack of confidence or purpose. Once those are fixed, everything else becomes easier.

Don't think a band-aid will cure cancer.

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