Write for humans

SEO strategists are going to hate me for writing this.

December 20, 2019

The obsession people have with SEO is mind boggling. It's as if SEO is a silver bullet to make up for having an undefined audience and not knowing what they want. I've seen a lot of marketers and the work that they produce. Most of the time, I'm disappointed because it's obvious what game they are playing. They write keyword stuffed blogs with no soul and refuse to write copy that engages people on an emotional level in the hopes of pointing Google searchers to a page.

It's not that I believe all content should be that way, but in order to actually connect with someone so they convert on your page, you can't write for a search engine. Search engines operate entirely on rationale, humans invest emotionally.

As such, both creative messaging and effective SEO need to be in harmony. You can write for search engines until you're blue in the face, but a search engine is not going to have the emotional nuance as the human who will be making a buying decision. You have to trigger them beyond having all the right keywords on your site.

If I had to put my finger on specific things that focusing solely on writing for search engines fails to consider, it'd be these two things:

  1. Keywords and other elements search engines take into account are replicable. If you can do it, so can your competitors and it will not help customers make a decision because you will sound exactly the same.
  2. Writing and creating content for search engines rarely makes for anything engaging, exciting, or different. However, it's these qualities that encourage people to share what they find regardless of whether Google likes it or not.

In short, make awesome content for humans. If possible, make it search engine friendly.

More you say?

It's Your Fault People Don't Understand Your Startup

For those who think no one seems to get it.

1.14.2020

When you are creating a startup, it's easy to get sucked into the mindset that your product/service is needed and that everyone could benefit from it. Regardless of how true that is, people just don't seem to get it. You drill down on your marketing efforts talking about the features of what you offer, but no one understands.

You're bitter. You're frustrated. And it's also your fault.

Yea. It's your fault. It's your fault people do not understand the value of what you've created.

"Zach, that's pretty harsh," you might say. But, I believe it's better than the alternative.

Here's the thing: if it's your fault people don't understand the value of what you've created, then you can change. If it's everyone else's fault, you're shit outta luck.

It's never too late, it's all your fault, but that is the absolute best-case scenario. The question is: what are you going to do about it?

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Rally the Neophiles | Software Branding

It doesn't make sense to build for anyone else.

1.15.2020

How much marketshare do you want? All of it?

Wow. That's an ambitious goal.

You want it now? Dang. Sounds like you're a real go-getter.

You can't have it.

At least not now. You're not ready. But there is a clear starting point that every successful software out there has shown us: build for neophiles. The innovators and early-adopters. It simply doesn't make sense to build for anyone else. Here's why:

Whenever we create something truly novel, we engage in pattern interrupt (thanks Seth Godin). Pattern interrupt places a user in a state of decision making, since they have encountered something outside their normal pattern of behavior. Slack, before it was adopted by every single organization worth talking about, was a pattern interrupt. Most teams communicated via email, text, etc. Not very effective. Even so, the thought of switching from the normal, (albeit shitty) pattern requires energy that people don't want to spend... unless trying out new things is their normal.

The only folks who fit that pattern are neophiles. They are people who want to find something new, who want to be in-the-know, and who are joyous when they find something novel they can test. Furthermore, they are the first stepping stone in gaining mass marketshare. If you want the masses to engage with your product, you have to first rally the Neophiles.

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