Write for humans

SEO strategists are going to hate me for writing this.

December 20, 2019

The obsession people have with SEO is mind boggling. It's as if SEO is a silver bullet to make up for having an undefined audience and not knowing what they want. I've seen a lot of marketers and the work that they produce. Most of the time, I'm disappointed because it's obvious what game they are playing. They write keyword stuffed blogs with no soul and refuse to write copy that engages people on an emotional level in the hopes of pointing Google searchers to a page.

It's not that I believe all content should be that way, but in order to actually connect with someone so they convert on your page, you can't write for a search engine. Search engines operate entirely on rationale, humans invest emotionally.

As such, both creative messaging and effective SEO need to be in harmony. You can write for search engines until you're blue in the face, but a search engine is not going to have the emotional nuance as the human who will be making a buying decision. You have to trigger them beyond having all the right keywords on your site.

If I had to put my finger on specific things that focusing solely on writing for search engines fails to consider, it'd be these two things:

  1. Keywords and other elements search engines take into account are replicable. If you can do it, so can your competitors and it will not help customers make a decision because you will sound exactly the same.
  2. Writing and creating content for search engines rarely makes for anything engaging, exciting, or different. However, it's these qualities that encourage people to share what they find regardless of whether Google likes it or not.

In short, make awesome content for humans. If possible, make it search engine friendly.

More you say?

Actions Speak Louder Than H1s

The brand that pays attention to the needs and wants of their ideal customer wins

12.12.2019

In my newsletters, I do a segment every month called the Brand Spotlight. Within these emails, I go over a brands positioning, messaging, visuals, crafted experiences, and what could be improved. Today, I was able to speak with my good friend, Melinda Livsey, about a recommended brand for the spotlight: Thuma.

Thuma sells bed frames. Really nice, easy to assemble bed frames.

When Melinda and I were discussing the things that made the brand impactful to her, we centered their success on one thing: the intention and thought that was put into every aspect of their experience makes them worth a premium and telling others about. Thuma showed they cared through their website, their product design, their packaging, instructions, and delivering on their promise as an easy to assemble product.

Think about it, if you encounter an amazing experience, even if it's more costly, you will tell others about it. In turn, putting more resources into the experience your customers have makes it so you don't have to spend so much on advertising. You've already paid for it by creating something worth telling others about.

The headline (H1) on your site could be the most SEO friendly on the planet, but it will not outdo a pleasant, worthwhile experience.

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Tear Your Brand in Half

The brand attributes of your startup cannot pull in opposite directions

11.25.2019

A common occurrence I hear from clients when discussing the attributes of their brand follows something along these lines: "We want it to look professional, but still playful."

Reading between the lines, what they are saying is this "we don't want to turn anyone off, so we are cool without adorning a personality that would offend anyone."

You cannot build a brand off that. Professional and playful are polar opposites on the spectrum. Your brand becomes a tied to two horses pulling in opposite directions and you go nowhere.

This comes in common forms, like companies that tout innovation and creativity, yet stick to a corporate blue because it won't offend anybody. Or the companies who claim to be different but choose to speak and act like their already successful competitors.

What would have been an otherwise inventive and distinct brand is torn in half by a lack of commitment.

Rather than trying to be everything, be something.

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