Who You Are Matters Most

Because what you do is replicable.

March 12, 2020

It's common practice for business owners to take great pride in their craft and their industry. I know this all too well, as I love being a designer and creating things. But, it's not the most important part of my business. Far from it actually. If it was, I'd be out of a job as websites like Fiverr and Upwork can beat me on price, they will give more options, and they are accessible 24/7.

Thankfully, people buy on emotion. Buying is a method of joining a tribe, what you buy says something about who you are. Think about it. If I buy a Tesla, it says something different about me than if I bought a Ford Mustang. It's a car, they have the same function, but there is a different sense of meaning established by joining either of those tribes.

All this to say, when people buy from your company, what are they saying about themselves? A couple things:

They believe what you believe and they are cool being associated with you. More succinctly, they are buying YOU. Not what you do, not because you're cheap, not because you're stronger, faster, better, they are buying from you because they connect with YOU emotionally.

That is what matters the most. You. Everything about you. All of your quirks, your experiences, your dreams, your vision, all of those things that construct you are what they buy.

Who you are matters most. You do the world a disservice in trying to be something you're not.

More you say?

Do You Have a Logo or a Blemish?

Even the most beautiful things are lessened by a small zit.

3.31.2020

You've heard it from me before that logos are not the most important part of your brand, however, they are a part of the experience nonetheless. With that in mind, it's important to get them right.

What are the core indicators of a successful logo? According so Sagi Haviv of Chermayeff, Geismar and Haviv (the identity agency responsible for the Chase Bank, MSNBC, Nat Geo, and Conservation International logos), it comes down to three things:

Simple, distinct, and appropriate.

Simple, meaning that it could be replicated at various sizes and applications without additional effort.

Distinct, meaning that it could be described after looking at it or perhaps doodled on a piece of paper and different from others in the same field.

Lastly, appropriate, meaning that you wouldn't have the same logo for a heavy metal band that you would for a cooking line designed to make people feel calm and tranquil. This doesn't mean tell the whole story, it means don't contradict yourself emotionally.

Simple, distinct, and appropriate. Logos that fail to meet this end up becoming blemishes wherever they are placed. The most elegant package, flyer, or product becomes tarnished with your hideous zit of a logo.

Take a look at your marketing collateral, your website, billboards, ads, business cards, etc.

Now ask yourself, do you have a logo or do you have a blemish?

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Snipers and Grenades

Effective positioning meets Call of Duty.

5.5.2020

I've been playing a lot of Call of Duty amidst the COVID-19 crisis. It's been quite a while, but something that's been all too familiar is the vast difference between snipers and grenades. Essential premise is this: snipers are extremely accurate. You definitely can't hit more than one person, but if you focus on just one person, you're highly likely to hit them. At both long distances and shorter distances with superb effectiveness.

Grenades, on the other hand, are meant to hit lots of people at once. But, they you generally chuck these and hope you hit something. It's highly unlikely unless you land in at the exact right place at the exact right time. Despite being more powerful than a sniper rifle, they aren't as accurate and less effective as a result.

What's the point?

If you want to brand with impact, focus intently on one person, scope them out, and snipe them. You're much more likely to hit the target.

Don't chuck a grenade and hope you hit someone.

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