What do you have for me?

Understanding what exactly your user is coming to you for.

November 9, 2020

After defining the demographics of your ideal user, you can dive deeper into what exactly they are coming to your company for.

Where to start? Think of it like a story. Chances are, there is some catalyzing event that has made them seek a solution. For example, they need to be more productive, they are tired of resetting their password, they have acne, they want to be healthier, etc. In short, what is the fire under their ass?

Secondly, you pair that fire with an extinguisher. Namely, this would be in the form of your product, a specific feature you have, or a service you provide.

This is the first step to tangibly expressing your brand through what you offer. Furthermore, in a way that is relevant to your target user.

More you say?

Design Billing

Why I don't bill by the hour.

2.28.2020

An email from Jonathan Stark came through my inbox today and brought up a good analogy. One worth sharing with all of you on this lovely Friday.

The gist of it is as follows:

When you buy a sandwich, the person making the sandwich doesn't say, "this might cost $5, we won't know until we're done making it."

What's the difference between that and saying a logo and a website might cost $20,000, but we won't know until we're done?

Geez, that sounds like a pain in the ass and disconcerting for the client on the other side of the transaction. This is the trap that hourly billing gets people in, both clients and service providers, a journey through the fog of unknowns that is costly and annoying.

The alternative? Diagnose for a set price (roughly 10% of the anticipated budget) and come up with three, tiered options at set prices. This might not be the best solution, but it's better than keeping a running clock and an hourly rate that never seems to stay under budget. At least a set price is predictable for both the client and the designer.

Why don't I bill hourly? Because I don't like leaving clients in a state of uncertainty.

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Seek and Steal

Stop trying to be original and try to make something good.

1.24.2020

"I want to be original," says the young startup founder. Well, I've got news for ya pal, you never will be and you will kill yourself trying to go down that road.

Everything is a derivative of something else. There is no new idea under the sun. Now, you can see this as negative or you can realize the opportunity you have to explore and put your spin on something already successful. The best creative work I come across is stolen. Meaning, the people that made it did not come up with the idea on their own, but they put it into a new context.

I'll give you an example, my friend Luis rebranded an agency a while ago. This agency's office overlooks a harbor in San Diego. So, he took the brand down a nautical path and turned them into a rebellious rouse of scallywags. They changed their name from Digital Style to VSSL, shifted all of their lingo to mirror a gang of pirates, and even named the rooms in their space after the places on a ship (the brig, the gulley, even the poop deck).

Here's the thing, Luis found every single element that went into that brand, he didn't conjure it out of thin air. The logo, the name, the language, the visuals, even the culture of the company is rooted in life at sea.

Find something inspirational and different, then steal it.

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