What do you have for me?

Understanding what exactly your user is coming to you for.

November 9, 2020

After defining the demographics of your ideal user, you can dive deeper into what exactly they are coming to your company for.

Where to start? Think of it like a story. Chances are, there is some catalyzing event that has made them seek a solution. For example, they need to be more productive, they are tired of resetting their password, they have acne, they want to be healthier, etc. In short, what is the fire under their ass?

Secondly, you pair that fire with an extinguisher. Namely, this would be in the form of your product, a specific feature you have, or a service you provide.

This is the first step to tangibly expressing your brand through what you offer. Furthermore, in a way that is relevant to your target user.

More you say?

I Don't Bill Hourly

Here's why:

10.19.2020

"We imagine this will take 20 hours of work."

Well, I can imagine quite a bit too. I can imagine the work would take 4 hours and that would be something, wouldn't it? I can also imagine it going over 20 hours, which would be a real bummer because we'd lose time.

What's the point? No one knows how long projects take. Billing by the hour puts the risk in my client's hands, since anything that takes longer than we'd initially planned becomes their problem instead of mine.That's not the kind of assurance I want to provide.

Sure, it could be easier to just keep the clock running and send a bill, but that is conformity. That is being unsure of how good you are as professional and being unable to create innovate solutions for clients. Billing hourly is not the rebel way.

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Obi-Wan

Because your company is not the hero.

3.10.2020

Luke Skywalker is the greatest example of the "hero" archetype. He has humble beginnings and does not understand his full potential. At least, not until he is called to adventure after the murder of his Aunt, Uncle, and the desperate call of Princess Leia. Facing down this behemoth of a journey, you gotta wonder what was going on in his head at the time.

"I have no skills beyond moisture farming and I'm a decent pilot, but taking on the Empire? I need help."

That's where Obi-Wan Kenobi comes into play. The old wizard who sees the greatness within Luke and helps him to overcome his own, self-imposed limits. Despite the fact that Luke is lost without him, Obi-Wan never lets it be known. He's not focused on his own success, he's focused on the success of Luke. If Luke succeeds, that is his victory. Granted, he does all he can offering mentorship (guidance and knowledge of the Force), tools (lightsaber), instruction and feedback, and, most importantly, honest encouragement.

Here's the thing:

Most companies see themselves as Luke.They think they are the hero, that saving the world depends on them. They are wrong and their self-interest will not inspire others to be better. To quote Marty Neumeier "the best brand builders see greatness in their customers, and figure out ways to enable it."

Unleash your inner Obi-Wan, you rebel.

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