Vibranium Shield Branding

What a superhero's tool of choice says about branding design.

June 24, 2020

In Marvel's Captain America: the First Avenger, Steve Rogers is transformed from a scrawny pipsqueak into the formidable super-soldier, Captain America.

After completing a successful rescue mission using nothing but a stage-prop shield, famous inventor and colleague, Howard Stark offers to improve upon the shield design.

He presents Rogers with a dozen different designs, some outfitted with electronics to zap his adversaries, some with spikes and other baggage. He glances on the ground and picks up a round disc.

"What's it made of?" he asks.

"That's vibranium, it's completely vibration absorbent." say's Stark.

After being put through a spur of the moment bullet deflection test, courtesy of an angry love-interest, Rogers chooses the shield and gives it a fresh paint job to match his uniform.

That was in 1944.

Fast forward into 2020 and the same shield is used in later battles without losing its gusto or its alignment with Cap's identity.

Why? Because it was a simple, elegant, and timeless choice. Unhindered by fads, excess, or things that would weigh it down.

The point? treat branding design the same way. Don't be bogged down by choices simply because they are popular today, aim for something genuinely useful and timeless.

The clip from the movie, for you poor souls who haven't seen it.

More you say?

Sauce

An excerpt from Obviously Awesome, part II.

5.26.2020

This is the second in a small series of punches surrounding April Dunford's Obviously Awesome! and how good positioning relates to good branding. Please read the first article before jumping into this one.

Enjoy!

Having gone through the process of seeking out the alternatives to your product, you should have a robust understanding of what is already out there within your market category. This is like being at a poker table and seeing each players' cards. You know what you're up against, now it's time to find a way to play.

The second piece in positioning a company is understanding what makes you special. From a product standpoint, this comes in the form of technical features, but it could expand into areas like delivery method (think Dollar Shave Club vs. Gillette), the business model (subscription vs. single purchase), or unique expertise (a developer with marketing skills or focus within a particular vertical).

After choosing the attributes and unique elements about your business, you could also examine the emotional qualities unique to your company. For example, Duluth Trading Co. and Patagonia make almost identical winter gear, but they are completely different emotionally. Duluth downplays any kind of sophistication despite the fact they charge $25 for a pair of Buck Naked Underwear. While Patagonia shifts its emotional value to serving the planet and altruism. Same products, different stories.

What do you care about? What story do you have? What personality can you bring to the table? It might be something you take for granted, but to everyone else, it is special. It's your secret sauce that shouldn't be kept a secret.

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Tell YOUR Story

A follow up from yesterday's MF Punch: the Lie

1.7.2020

Yesterday's MF Punch for reference.

"What do you mean?" is the most common response when I tell people I work with rebels.

I proceed to tell my core belief that being different is more important than being better. But there's more to it than that. What drives this core belief home is that I live it. Perhaps not in gigantic ways, but here are a couple examples:

I refuse to be on Facebook and Instagram.

I don't drink or partake in other substances.

I rarely take calls or meetings in the morning.

I plan on staying a small company for the foreseeable future.

These are stories about who I am as a person that seep into my business as well. Stories like these are strong because they are genuine, I don't have to put on a face to live out the truth I proclaim.

When you build your brand, tell your story. Open up your ugly, the things people will think you are weird for. I guarantee there are people who will not like it, but the flip side is that there will others who appreciate it.

Tell YOUR story. Not the one you think people want to hear.

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