Unplug

Back soon. Here's why

August 3, 2020

“Almost everything will work again if you unplug it for a few minutes, including you.” — Anne Lamott

I'm taking August to pull back from my newsletters, MF Punches, and take some time to recharge.

But don't you worry, I'll be back 😎

More you say?

Design by Committee

Why it's ineffective and the alternative.

6.4.2020

I had a call with a prospective client yesterday looking to get some collateral made for their company. During our call it became clear that there were going to be multiple people making the decisions and signing off on creative.

It's not like it was just two people either, hell it wasn't even four. On this project, there would be eight people that would have to look at this an approve it. Eight!

That's a lot of cooks. Respectfully, I said that it doesn't work out well to design by committee and that it didn't sound like it would be a good fit. They agreed and we got off the call.

Here is why design by committee is a bad idea: vanilla ice cream.

Allow me to explain, there are hundreds of unique ice cream flavors. From cookies and cream, mint and chip, rainbow sherbet, Ben and Jerry's Dairy-Free Peanut Butter Cookie Dough (my personal favorite), or even ice cream with candied grasshoppers. These flavors are memorable, whether you like them or not, because they have elements of distinction.

Now imagine you have eight different people in a room and you try and get them to agree on one flavor. Fat chance.

You will end up with choosing vanilla because it's good enough to do the job and it won't upset anyone. But it's not going to turn heads like the others. What's more is that if one person decided on getting a unique ice cream flavor, like cookies and cream, I doubt anyone would be morbidly detested by the choice. It's ice cream for Pete's sake.

Same thing with design. As long as you follow the basic principles, it's difficult to arrive at a detestable solution. It's well designed, that's what matters.

The alternative is this: understand that you aren't building something for yourself, you are building something for someone else. Be it investors, customers, whomever it is, build for them.

Next, establish one decision maker. Someone who can be trusted to make a good decision and let them do their job.

Do not design by committee.

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Ugly Scaffold

Why you shouldn't be surprised by any of the creative you make.

10.28.2020

Cinema has done a phenomenal job of showing us drama. Think about it, if everything in a movie went according to plan and the characters acted rationally, there'd be no tension and therefore no movie. It'd just be a walk through of good decision making and civic discussion about what to do next. It'd follow a logical progression.

What sucks is that creatives often infuse that drama into their creative process in the form of a pitch or a big reveal.

This isn't good. Pitches put both parties in a bad position and create an ultimatum from the event. How do we fix that?

We scaffold. More importantly, we build an ugly scaffold.

A scaffold? Yes, like the one's you see on the sides of skyscrapers. These structures follow the building from the ground up and work alongside the deliverable until it is ready to show. They are hideous, but they allow everyone to safely navigate from the ground-level to the top.

What does scaffolding look like for building a brand identity?

  • Discovery and research
  • Strategic alignment and goal setting
  • Brand audit
  • Stylescapes and creative direction
  • Showing sketches and ugly iterations
  • A final deliverable

A good designer can educate and guide folks along the process (and it better be a process) from nothing to something. Instead of a giant presentation where clients give a giant "yes" or a giant "no," scaffolding allows for small tweaks along the way and a unified effort.

Build an ugly scaffold.

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