Ugly Scaffold

Why you shouldn't be surprised by any of the creative you make.

October 28, 2020

Cinema has done a phenomenal job of showing us drama. Think about it, if everything in a movie went according to plan and the characters acted rationally, there'd be no tension and therefore no movie. It'd just be a walk through of good decision making and civic discussion about what to do next. It'd follow a logical progression.

What sucks is that creatives often infuse that drama into their creative process in the form of a pitch or a big reveal.

This isn't good. Pitches put both parties in a bad position and create an ultimatum from the event. How do we fix that?

We scaffold. More importantly, we build an ugly scaffold.

A scaffold? Yes, like the one's you see on the sides of skyscrapers. These structures follow the building from the ground up and work alongside the deliverable until it is ready to show. They are hideous, but they allow everyone to safely navigate from the ground-level to the top.

What does scaffolding look like for building a brand identity?

  • Discovery and research
  • Strategic alignment and goal setting
  • Brand audit
  • Stylescapes and creative direction
  • Showing sketches and ugly iterations
  • A final deliverable

A good designer can educate and guide folks along the process (and it better be a process) from nothing to something. Instead of a giant presentation where clients give a giant "yes" or a giant "no," scaffolding allows for small tweaks along the way and a unified effort.

Build an ugly scaffold.

More you say?

Shared Belief

I'll buy when I know we believe the same thing.

9.24.2020

I'm a huge fan of Buck Mason shirts. Pima cotton, well-cut, breathable, and classic. Que bella.

Something that dawned on me though was this question: why do I admire this brand so much and why do I go out of my way to buy almost exclusively from them.

Back up to my college years. The hipster movement of adorning button-up shirts, chukka boots, and thrifting your way to style was in full swing. I recall spending hours searching through thrift stores to find trendy looking shirts that would match my barrage of beaded bracelets and my patina ring made out of a quarter. But, I didn't believe all that stuff was really cool. In truth, I found myself hating how much time I spent shopping for all that trendy shit and how complicated the process was. Turns out, I believed more in simplicity.

Flash forward to today. I keep a Buck Mason tag in my bible as a bookmark. What's the first line on it? "We make fashion less complicated."

Boom. Instant brand alignment.

Here's the thing: the reason I buy exclusively from Buck Mason is because of this shared value. If you want to build a rebellious brand, you must find that overlapping belief residing within both of you.

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Slay the Dragon

Why it is better to launch before you are ready.

2.12.2020

Startups frequently align with the idea that you need to be absolutely perfect before you launch your product/service. That's a surefire way to never make progress.

Part of me thinks it's because they want to be seen as the best and idealized, rather than being something good.

I'll be honest, I know my website could improve. I know I launch articles and newsletters with spelling errors. I know that I sometimes forget pieces of information that would have made a difference in a sales call. But we cannot go on expecting that everything has to be, or will be for that matter, perfect.

It's as if startups conflate being vulnerable and human with being undesirable. That fear of being undesirable is a dragon, snarling and biting, waiting to inevitably breakdown your door and consume you rotisserie style.

Screw that, take the offensive. Launch with imperfections, bumps, and blemishes to say, "we are not perfect, but we will continue to get better."

Slay the dragon.

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