Typeface Hack

Three rules the most important part of your visual identity.

October 6, 2020

Typography is the use of letterforms in design. It's everywhere. In logos, in signage, in websites, everything. Figures that when designing a brand identity this is given a lot of attention. Truthfully, I think people underestimate the power of well selected typefaces. They are certainly just as important as crafting a memorable logo and can make or break a brand identity. So how do you figure out which one(s) to choose? There are three things to consider:

Simplicity, distinction, and appropriateness.

Simple
Typefaces selected for your brand need to be easily seen and legible. This means no comic sans, no papyrus, no curly q's. You can't write a paragraph in those typefaces without straining a reader's eyes. When selecting a typeface, consider asking yourself this question: can I read a blog in this typeface and not be annoyed by all of the characters I see before me? If you are, time to change.

Distinction
There is a fine line between choosing typefaces that are plain and overtly stylized. The key is to understand that a typeface does not need a lot of swirls and flourishes to make it beautifully individual. It could be the way the O's are crafted, the subtle rounding of corners, or sharp, stylized serifs. Whatever it is, I guarantee it doesn't have to be much. A little spice goes a long way with typefaces.

Appropriateness
In all things brand identity, you cannot deviate from the core emotional values of the brand. Meaning, if you call people to be gritty and tough don't use a typeface fit for a wedding invitation (and vice versa). Typefaces have an emotional quality to them. Take time to think about what it makes you feel. Do you feel nostalgic or futuristic? Where have you seen this typeface before and what does that make you feel? Whatever you do, make sure the typeface is aligned to the gut-feeling you want your brand to connote.

It's just three things, but they can carry your brand identity a long way. Go snag some typefaces!

More you say?

MVPs and MVCs | Software Branding

Applying the same agile mindset of an MVP to branding.

1.13.2020

When you start building a product, your first goal is to make sure it works. It doesn't need all the bells and whistles you anticipate it will house in the future, only the most important ones. The ones that will set you apart and lay the foundation for everything your product could become.

This is referred to as your MVP (minimum viable product).

In constructing a brand for your software, taking a similar approach is essential. Specifically, you build a brand around a specific user base. It doesn't cover everyone you anticipate this product could serve, only the ones who would find it most valuable. The ones who will see you as set apart from any other option they have.

This would be referred to as your MVC (most valued customer).

By focusing on them and them alone, you can tailor your messaging, your identity, your marketing, everything you do is focused around them. Which is helpful, given that it is impossible speak with impact to a generalized crowd.

Have the courage to focus on your most valued customer. They will thank you for it and you'll make something amazing as a result.

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Needs and Wants

Two very different things that need to be balanced in your branding.

12.11.2019

I love backpacking. Nothing makes me feel more alive or at peace than sitting on top of a mountain with no one around me for miles. Backpacking requires a substantial amount of gear for surviving out where there are no grocery stores or hospitals nearby. It's safe to say that the needs of a backpacker are vast. Backpackers need food, they need water, and they need shelter. Those are basics. If you don't have those, you're screwed.

So why did I bring a tactical axe with me on my last trip and why did my friend Joey bring a huge buck knife? Sure, we could use them to cut fishing line, chop up firewood, and my axe even doubled as a hammer, but the truth is, we really didn't need either of those things. We wanted them to feel manly and adventurous. Our wants justified the need of bringing along these items for the tasks they could accomplish.

We conjured logical needs to suit an emotional desire.

You could argue that this doesn't apply to everything, but I'd beg to differ. Even the essential needs we had like food, water, and shelter were all emotional decisions. If we were logical, we probably wouldn't have even gone backpacking because we would have saved money and subjected ourselves to less risk. But we decided to forego those essentials in the search of greater adventure. That's why we bought a $110 water filter and why I bought a bunch of compact, lightweight food for a premium price. Essential needs, but definitely an emotional decision.

The needs were simple, food, water, shelter, but the want was freedom, adventure, and camaraderie.

Ask yourself, what is the want behind the need people are looking to our startup to fulfill? Build your brand around it.

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