The Sorcerer and the Nerd

Subtle changes cause a big shift in branding.

May 19, 2020

When J.K. Rowling submitted the first Harry Potter book, it didn't have the same title as we've known. It was first called Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone and later adapted to Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone. Why? These two things are synonymous.

Attitude. When you hear the term "philosopher," it sounds geeky and pompous. A sorcerer on the other hand, bolsters the idea of mystery, power, and elusiveness.

What's the point? Branding is full of nuance, while these two terms on paper mean the same thing, their emotional qualities are different. In branding, it's not just what you say, how you look, and what you do, but the attitude you bring to the table.

More you say?

You feel me? | Software Branding

Finding the common ground that will elevate your brand.

1.18.2020

"Friendship is born at that moment when one person says to another: 'What! You too? I thought I was the only one!'"

-C.S. Lewis

When diving into knowing your user base, you will hopefully find common interest. In the things you both do, the things you listen to, who you respect, etc.

I would urge you to dive deeper. What do you both feel? What do you both wish was right in the world? What do you both believe?

If you can find this and communicate it you don't have to win people over, you end up rallying teammates to help you accomplish a goal. You are aligned.

A brand built on mutual values is set to flourish.

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Between Notes

Reasons to give layouts breathing room.

10.21.2020

I want you to imagine a drum kit. Now imagine someone sits on a stool behind it and persistently pounds the snare, the toms, and cymbals violently, repeatedly, and without rest. The resulting bash of noise is nothing you would expect from a top performer or something you'd want to hear on a record. It sucks.

Now think about someone else who tactfully and precisely plays each piece of the kit with rhythm and technique. They create a series of harmonious tones that entice your ears. They don't hit every piece at the exact same time, they let them breathe and give each its due space in the spotlight. They rest between notes.

Same principle applies to design. If you try to play all the pieces of your kit (a call to action, a tagline, your logo, information, graphs, charts, etc) at once, you will create noise.

Rest between notes.

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