The Creative Curse

Creatives, entrepreneurs, and startup founder beware.

May 13, 2020

Creative minds, though responsible for new ideas and solving big problems, have a huge shadow: the inability to give those new ideas time. This is especially true in branding. It's almost inevitable that after going through a new brand identity, strategy, etc, the desire to change will pop up. A new idea will strike and it must manifest or it will go away.

But int he context of branding, assuming you do a good job, you have to resist. Branding is something that should remain consistent and be given its due before making massive overhauls.

Commons areas where this desire arises:

  • Expanding target markets
  • Redoing the the name or logo
  • Expanding a color palette
  • Adding new typefaces

Look, these things might need to change, but if you have to let them settle before you can make an informed decision as to whether or not they need to change. This doesn't mean you can't change small things, like experimenting with new ads, altering your layouts, running A/B tests, but it should all cohere to the strategy you are trying to implement.

Point being: resist your creative impulses to start something new before your previous task has been finished and given time to rest.

More you say?

Tortoise and Hare

Playing short games and long games

6.25.2020

Short term strategies: undercut competitors, have fire sales, adopt fads.

Long term strategy: build things that are useful and meaningful.

In branding, in sales, in everything planning for the long game ensures that you're given more time to play at all.

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Who do you want to help? | Software Branding

Positioning your software to be impactful.

1.12.2020

Softwares can help a lot of people in many different ways. Which is another way of saying, there is an infinite number of replacements for your product. Venmo does the same thing as Paypal, Mailchimp does the same thing as SendGrid, Freshbooks does the same thing as Quickbooks, and Notion does the same thing as Asana.

How do you stand out? You decide to help someone specific.

If your software can help anyone, then you have your pick of the litter and can make the decision to build something special for someone.

"But won't I get bored or lose the opportunity to expand?"

Doubtful. There is so much hidden need for specific user groups that the list of new features and ideas to make your ideal user's life easier are endless. Plus, you can always expand once you've exhausted your initial market or duplicate your tech for another market with slight modification.

Doing so makes you irreplaceable, makes it easy to market and sell, and makes it easy to build an awesome brand. Why? Because you are able to focus rather than constantly chasing shiny objects.

It takes courage, but if you can answer the question, "who do you want to help?" Building your brand will get immensely easier.

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