Tangential Stories | Software Branding

A lack of focus in your product is like a movie with too many plots... they both suck

March 10, 2021

Products are supposed to solve problems. Specific problems. Much like how a movie is supposed to guide you through the story of how a hero solves a problem, like Luke Skywalker defeating the Empire, Alan, Stu, and Phil finding Doug, or Princess Mia finding confidence in herself (hell yea I watched the Princess Diaries).

These are the main plots to these movies, anything that doesn't push the hero towards solving this problem is a distraction. Think about it, every subplot takes us closer to this goal.

Luke has to meet Han Solo to leave Tatooine, they get pulled into the Death Star, they rescue Leia to recover the Death Star's weakness, and they attack it to DEFEATĀ THEĀ EMPIRE.

If there had been a subplot where they stopped on Hoth to grab snow cones and rally a group of Tauntauns you'd think the movie was stupid.

Keep the user pointed to solving a specific problem with your product and don't create other products that pull them away from that core problem.

More you say?

It's Not About You

Why building a brand requires you to focus on someone else.

3.3.2020

A brand is not a logo, it's not a product, it's not your reputation, it's not your name, so what is it?

A brand is the gut-feeling someone has toward your business. You make them feel a certain way through your company's behavior, it's appearance, and the experiences you provide.

All of this to say that making someone feel a certain way requires you, the business owner, to stop thinking about yourself and think about how you will impact someone else.

It doesn't matter what you like, what matters is what the person you are making this company for likes.

It doesn't matter if you don't like the name of your company, what matters is how it impacts your user.

It doesn't matter that you don't like your logo, what matters is how easy it is for your ideal customer to recognize it.

You get the picture.

The beauty of this, is that the pressure is taken off of you and your subjective standards, and instead focused on how much you can affect someone else.

It's not about you.

read more

Value

An excerpt from Obviously Awesome, part III.

5.27.2020

This is the third article in a small series of punches surrounding April Dunford's Obviously Awesome! and how good positioning relates to good branding. Please read the first article and second article before jumping into this one.

Enjoy!

You know what the alternatives are, you know the special things that your startup unique, now you need to establish what makes that valuable.

It's tricky to get lost in the weeds here and even harder to stay objective.Typically, startups say things like "great user experience," or "great customer service," but that's trite and, quite frankly, to be expected. If you don't have those components, your business is gonna fail anyway.

Value goes deeper and it's objective. For example, building a repository of customer feedback and concrete examples of your secret sauce in action. Personally, this is seen in my business through my reviews and the consistent compliments I get on organization. Organization is the secret sauce (or one of them, I hope) and the value is that it saves time and keeps projects moving smoothly.

As this pertains to branding, it's a difficult to see what the emotional component is to quantitative value. However, it is clear that in gathering the quantitive data on your startup, you will see how you make people feel. If you're doing your job right, what you want people to feel and what they actually feel is aligned. That's a mark of good branding.

read more