Sloth Shit

Time spent does not equate to value produced.

June 8, 2020

After 23 trials and test results, the Sloth Sanctuary concluded that sloths take an average of 16 days to fully digest food and rid itself of food waste. 16 full days is the same as 384 hours, 9.6 work weeks, or two working months to produce shit.

I'm currently reading The Lean Startup by Eric Ries. He talks about one of his first ventures and that they had spent six months working on a product that no one liked. No one knew how to use it, what good it did, or why they should buy it. Without mincing words: it was shit. It earned no money and it didn't help anyone.

What's the point?

It doesn't matter how long something took to make and how much effort you've put into it, if it's not useful to anyone, it's shit.

The remedy? Make something useful for someone and find out early whether or not it has value.

More you say?

Interesting Proposition | Software Branding

Affecting the life of a particular person is the key to being irreplaceable.

1.18.2020

Being better is a unsellable proposition. Better is subjective in nature, difficult to see from the outside, and even harder to define.

For example, Webflow is a web design tool. So are WordPress, Squarespace, Wix, and Weebly. Which one is better? Well, it depends on who you are asking.

Webflow's proposition is that they are a web design tool for designers. Specifically, designers who work within a hybrid engineering-like role and can think in systems. Squarespace is also for designers who don't care about code quality and are instead focused on making things look pretty and working fast. WordPress is not for designers at all and is catered toward those who want as many features as possible regardless of code quality.

The point? The person that you anticipate to use your software is who will guide features, prioritize them, and dictate which ones are misnomers.

That is how you create an interesting proposition.

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Subtle Notes

The devil and the angels are in the details of your brand.

7.13.2020

I was shopping at Smart and Final yesterday. While standing in line, I looked down at the placements stickers for social distancing. They said two things: "please stay six feet apart," and "we know you have many options, thank you for choosing us."

Next, when I was in line, the cashiers had done their job so well that they had eliminated a lengthy line entirely. Their manager came out and congratulated his team.

What's the big deal?

For one, this store took things that seem small and superfluous and made them something special. This could also be done with the welcome letter for a newsletter subscription, or cards sent to say thank you to clients, or phraseology around being open or closed. The point is that they put an authentic spin on it to make it memorable and relevant to this brand, when they could have just passed over it without much care.

The devil and the angels are in the details.

You choose who it is.

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