Seek and Steal

Stop trying to be original and try to make something good.

January 24, 2020

"I want to be original," says the young startup founder. Well, I've got news for ya pal, you never will be and you will kill yourself trying to go down that road.

Everything is a derivative of something else. There is no new idea under the sun. Now, you can see this as negative or you can realize the opportunity you have to explore and put your spin on something already successful. The best creative work I come across is stolen. Meaning, the people that made it did not come up with the idea on their own, but they put it into a new context.

I'll give you an example, my friend Luis rebranded an agency a while ago. This agency's office overlooks a harbor in San Diego. So, he took the brand down a nautical path and turned them into a rebellious rouse of scallywags. They changed their name from Digital Style to VSSL, shifted all of their lingo to mirror a gang of pirates, and even named the rooms in their space after the places on a ship (the brig, the gulley, even the poop deck).

Here's the thing, Luis found every single element that went into that brand, he didn't conjure it out of thin air. The logo, the name, the language, the visuals, even the culture of the company is rooted in life at sea.

Find something inspirational and different, then steal it.

More you say?

Have a F*cking Mission | Software Branding

One that is about changing people's lives, not about growing revenue.

1.18.2020

Bad design and bad experiences stem from misalignment. From not being guided by selfless service, but instead seeking to get things done cheaply, quickly, and with the most return possible.

Those are shitty goals. They have no longevity and are selfish. They drive companies to do lame things like sell user data or create new features/offerings that have little value and are haphazard at best.

What to do instead? Focus on changing someone's life for the better. Center all of your efforts on that change.

Have a fucking mission.

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Defining "Brand"

Setting the record straight on a trendy and frequently misused term.

4.28.2020

The most common answer a startup will give to "what is a brand," is something along the lines of "logo," or a "visual representation of your company." While the visuals are a key part in making a brand, they do not describe its entirety. Marty Neumeier, author of the Brand Gap describes it this way:

The brand is a gut feeling. It's an emotion felt by someone after interacting with an entity, usually a business.

What is a brand? A gut-feeling, don't let anyone else tell you otherwise.

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