Say It Again to My Face

You don't have to change your pitch every time.

February 4, 2020

I'm a huge Jordan Peterson fan. I've read his books, I listen to his podcast, I watch his YouTube videos, and I seek him out on other people's podcasts as well.

I've even caught myself repeating some of his phrases to others. Things like "set your house in order before you judge the world," "hierarchies are built on conscientiousness and competence," "tell the truth or, at least, don't lie," and "walk the line between chaos and order, that's where you find fulfillment."

You might think it's impressive on my part (and if you do, stop it, you're making me blush), but it's impossible to forget those ideas if you listen to the guy more than once. Truth be told, he doesn't deviate a whole lot from a few central tenants, which makes them easy to recognize and remember. It's these central ideas that become the pillars for all his other ideas to stand upon. Even when he does deviate, you can link it back to his core beliefs.

What does this have to do with branding?

Beat the hell out of one idea and let your brand become known for it, that's how you gain brand authority.

If you aren't getting tired of touting your idea about how the world should be different, then you aren't sending your message enough.

An anecdotal example: I've tried to become synonymous with the word "rebel," I've been using it for over a year. It wasn't until a couple months ago that I started having others say the word to me. Point being, it took more than a year of getting that idea out there to have others recognize it and associate me with it.

Say your idea. After that, say it again. Finally, say it again to my face. Eventually, I'll remember it.

More you say?

The Lie

What it means to genuinely build an authentic brand.

1.6.2020

Last year, I was talking to a man at a networking event. He asked what I did for work and I told him, "I work with rebels. Rebels are the startups challenging the status quo. I help them gain more confidence through branding and design."


He paused. "Ok, how would you help me?"


I told him that a brand is a person's gut feeling or perception of a business. The art of branding is using the business's personality, image, and beliefs to foster that gut feeling. This creates trust and an emotional attachment between the customer and the business.


He told me he had named his company Best ______. He said that his industry wasn't exciting, his business couldn't have a personality and that the only actionable "branding" route for him to take was calling himself "the best." His next sentence was what shocked me the most though:


"If I was to build a brand, I'd have to lie."


"You'd have to lie?" I questioned.


He believed that creating a brand would mean that he'd have to create a false personality for his company. I kept talking with him, asked him what he liked to do in his spare time, and what he valued.


Turns out, he builds full-scale medieval catapults in his spare time. He loved comedy. Diving deeper, his greatest desire was that his team would show up to after-work team-building events.


I looked at his logo, the name of his company, their colors, and the way they presented themselves online. Nothing about those elements aligned with who this man is. The brand was stoic, staid, and lacked any character.


What he had built was a brand that others would expect of him. He was putting on his business face, trying with everything that he could to be something he isn't.


If that's not a lie, I don't know what is.


Branding is not covering up who you are in the hopes of appealing to somebody. It's the direct opposite, it's showcasing who you really are and going all-in on it. That is what creates an emotional connection with someone else.

read more

Fast and Good

You cannot wait for lightning to strike.

5.14.2020

Design seems to have a drawn out and lengthy process. I don't know about you, but I really don't like it. Especially if you're working with startups that need to move fast. How do you fix it? You work together, show the ugly, and focus on getting a bunch of guesswork eliminated.

If you can move fast, you're good at what you do, and you can coach people through the process, this shouldn't be an issue.

This applies to everything. Logos, websites, apps, collateral. Hammer out as much of the details in low-fidelity form as possible.

read more