One-Liner | Software Branding

If you cannot describe the impact of your software in one-line, try this formula.

April 13, 2021

P + S = R

The (P) problem when combined with a this (S) solution drives these (R) results.

Plain and simple.

Some examples:

Your passwords suck and expose you to risk. Dashlane's simple application makes bulletproof passwords and keeps your data secure.

Coding emails is draining and boring. Mailchimp's drag and drop email creator allows you to easily create email campaigns that customers love.

Handing your website designs to a developer ruins them. Webflow's no-code website builder allows you to create pixel-perfect websites that let your creativity shine.

Can you write a one-liner?

More you say?

But is it worth it? | Software Branding

A case for branding's impact on software.

1.18.2020

I just wanna build a good product.

You should. And you should also build something of legacy.

How?

Help your ideal users connect with you emotionally. Give them pieces of delight with every interaction of your app. Make it easy for them to remember you and recognize you. Encourage them to trust the new things you release into the world.

In short, build a brand.

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A Little Bit of Courage and Color | Software Branding

Choosing good brand colors for your software has risk and reward.

1.7.2020

It takes balls to do something unexpected and different. In the case of choosing brand colors for your software, this is most evident and it matters greatly. Color is one of the core ways your brand coheres its marketing efforts, expresses itself, and distinguishes your brand from competitors.

Uber demonstrated this well during their rebrand in 2018. The black and white base of their brand colors allowed them to expand their marketing efforts globally and uniformly while shifting the focus to rich photography of their users. Difficult to do if you're playing with a myriad of colors.

Compared to their largest competitor, Lyft, who bolsters a hot pink badge of courage, the Uber color palette connotes feelings of maturity, elitism, and professionalism. A smart move in trying to distance themselves from the hyper-friendly and childish Lyft.

What's cool is that the flip-side of this is also true and valid for Lyft's color choices. It takes just as much fortitude to come up with the hot pinks, poppin' purples, and other vibrant hues that construct their energetic and playful appearance. There is no way you'd mistake ads from either brand for each other, in large part due to color.

The point? Have the courage to use color boldly and to stake your claim emotionally. Use it often, with confidence, and throughout your product as well as the pieces that sell it.

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