Measuring "Brand"

Yes, you can measure it. This is how.

April 29, 2020

Since branding is an emotional subject, it gets hard to manage. Specifically, it gets hard to measure. Cue Marty Neumeier (again). In his book The Brand Flip he lays out a structure for measuring the effectiveness of building a brand in what has been called the Brand Ladder. The goal of the Brand Ladder is to see how well you are elevating a customer's experience with your company. If you score low, it means you're a commodity, easily capable of being replaced. If you score high, customers are likely to become repeat buyers, evangelists, and feel like they can't live without you.

Here is an outline of the scorecard (from your customer's point of view):

Satisfied Grade 1-5

__ The company/product has met my expectations.

__ The company charges a fair price for the product.

__ TOTAL (highest score of 10)

Delighted Grade 1-5 and multiply by 2

__ I've been pleasantly surprised by the company/product.

__ I would happily recommend it to others.

__ TOTAL x 2 (highest score of 20)

Engaged Grade 1-5 and multiply by 3

__ I identify well with the other customers of this company/product.

__ I would go out of my way for the company and its customers.

__ TOTAL x 3 (highest score of 30)

Empowered Grade 1-5 and multiply by 4

__ The company/product is essential to my life.

__ I would be very sorry if it went out of business.

__ TOTAL x 4 (highest score of 40)

__ Grand Total (Highest Score of 100)

But it doesn't end there. Like any other assessment, you have to dive deeper and unearth the reasons behind them. What is it about your company that affects these scores? Is it design? Is it your messaging? Is it the product? You can measure the effects of branding all day, but if you are not willing to check on the factors contributing to its success, you might as well not even bother. Sounds like something I should write about tomorrow...

More you say?

You feel me? | Software Branding

Finding the common ground that will elevate your brand.

1.18.2020

"Friendship is born at that moment when one person says to another: 'What! You too? I thought I was the only one!'"

-C.S. Lewis

When diving into knowing your user base, you will hopefully find common interest. In the things you both do, the things you listen to, who you respect, etc.

I would urge you to dive deeper. What do you both feel? What do you both wish was right in the world? What do you both believe?

If you can find this and communicate it you don't have to win people over, you end up rallying teammates to help you accomplish a goal. You are aligned.

A brand built on mutual values is set to flourish.

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Bad Names = Bad Identities

The one thing you need to clear up before you start working on a visual identity.

10.13.2020

The Nike swoosh, the Apple apple, the Target bullseye. All of these logos are recognizable in an instant and yes, it took a while for them to get there, but there is a common thread between them oft-overlooked in the success of their brand identities:

They have good names.

Since the name of a brand is further up in the headwaters than the logo, it makes sense that a crappy name will hinder the success of the visual identity. Don't believe me? Well, let's try these with different monikers.

Nike -> Elegant Running Solutions.
A swoosh would not fare well under this.

Apple -> Creative Computers, Inc.
Why the hell is the logo an apple?

Target -> Minneapolis Market (Target started in this city)
The bullseye loses all gusto.

You get the picture. Brand identities, just like people's identities include a lot from the name. Why do you think authors and screenwriters obsess over the names of these characters they create? It matters and there is an emotional value to the name of a company.

If you don't nail your name and have it aligned with the emotional value you want to manifest within your audience, your identity as a whole will suffer. How do you do that?

Define your brand.

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