Have a F*cking Mission | Software Branding

One that is about changing people's lives, not about growing revenue.

March 2, 2021

Bad design and bad experiences stem from misalignment. From not being guided by selfless service, but instead seeking to get things done cheaply, quickly, and with the most return possible.

Those are shitty goals. They have no longevity and are selfish. They drive companies to do lame things like sell user data or create new features/offerings that have little value and are haphazard at best.

What to do instead? Focus on changing someone's life for the better. Center all of your efforts on that change.

Have a fucking mission.

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A Few of Their Favorite Things | Software Branding

Aligning your software brand with your most valued customers.

1.13.2020

Chances are, your brand is already out in the world.

What? Yes! It is. Your brand is the emotional value people attribute to your company, value they already find in many other things throughout their day.

For example, if you want your brand to be seen as happy, joyful, youthful, and teeming zest for life, I bet your ideal users experience this in other places. Perhaps it's from an ice cream shop, a children's author, or a TV Show. The point is that somewhere out there is a prime example of these attributes. The same would be said of any other adjective as well: elite, progressive, friendly, serious, stoic, sarcastic, brave, funny, classic, you get the point.

Your job in building a brand for your most valued customers is to understand what emotions are missing from the market category you want to enter, research places these emotions are found within your customer's life, and steal the things that make them memorable.

Seriously, steal them. Steal the colors, steal the phrases, steal the pictures, steal the shapes, steal the experience as much as you can.

Why is this effective? Because you are taking something familiar and placing it into a new context. This is the recipe for novelty.

Happy stealing.

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All Design is About Mitigating Risk

Sometimes the greatest gain is not a gain at all.

1.10.2020

Yesterday, I wrote about how good logos do not make more money. The essential premise was that a good logo is not meant to earn people more money, but counters the cost of having a bad logo. Such as having to reprint collateral when a good logo finally emerges, losing equity in an image that changed, negative impressions, or having to repurpose/reconstruct the logo for various applications (social icons, favicons, app icons, small scale, etc.).

It got me thinking though, isn't all design about mitigating risk or cutting cost? Some would argue that design can earn more money, like going through a rebrand to appeal to a more affluent market, designing an ad meant to drive revenue, or building a streamlined website to increase conversion. But, I'm not convinced this means design's core function is to earn more money.

When you're rebranding to appear to a more affluent market, what you're really doing is mitigating the risk of appearing cheap or scammy.

When designing an ad to increase revenue, what you're really doing is mitigating the risk of being off brand or having a Peleton faux pas.

When you're building a streamlined website, what you're really doing is mitigating the risk of user confusion and discomfort.

Focusing on how you can make more money is great, but that doesn't seem to be design's core capacity. Design is meant to mitigate risk.

The risk of appearing unprofessional.

The risk of having a rigid, difficult identity system.

The risk of looking dysfunctional.

The risk of making a user's experience negative.

Whatever it may be, good design is about mitigating risk.

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