Haunted by More | Software Branding

Avoiding the plague of featuritis, employee burnout, and stressed leadership.

January 27, 2021

It's easy to get caught in the trap of "more is better." More features, more services, more users, more shareholders, more views. More is a hungry ghost. Endlessly craving and never satisfied.

On top of that, they haunt you. Chasing hungry ghosts inevitably ends with the roles reversed.

"More" doesn't end and it pushes companies to do costly things that they wouldn't do otherwise. If you want to chase after more you need more hands, you need more money, you need to fundraise, you need to step out of the garage and buy a fancy office, you need to pull all-nighters, you stretch your team. All because you are haunted by "more."

An alternative: offer the smallest, best promise you can make. Small, so you know you can keep them and accomplish what is asked of you. Over time, they will build on each other you will have something amazing.

It's a good way to keep hungry ghosts out of your life.

More you say?

Brand For One, Market to Many

What to do when your startup has multiple market segments.

4.9.2020

I was chatting with my friend Brian yesterday about his startup. He asked, "what did you think of our branding?"

I asked, "it depends, who are you trying to talk to and what do you want them to feel?"

He wasn't sure. It sounded like there were multiple target markets he was trying to reach with his product and he wasn't sure how he could build a brand that would reach all of them.

Here's the thing:

You cannot build a brand for everyone. In fact, it's smart to build a brand for one person. Since the brand is an emotion, an already vaporous concept, you make it far less tangible with the more people you try to affect. The best brands are constructed for one person. This allows you to focus entirely on making something that somebody will love. Fortunately, there is always spill-over and, because humans are so complex, chances are that we all have a piece of that one persona within us. You have to accept the fact that your brand cannot win over everyone. Even Nike and apple have their haters.

Marketing your brand, however, can be done to multiple people. I gave Brian the analogy of seasoned salt. Seasoned salt is like the brand, it's essence, flavor, and makes whatever meat it's combined with taste like seasoned salt. You can put it on fish, chicken, steak, pork, whatever, it's hasn't changed. Same thing with applying your brand to your marketing efforts. You might have a very specific message or offering for different target markets, but you make sure it's still contains the essence of the brand.

In short, you build the brand for one person, but you can market it to many.

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The Semiotics Advantage | Software Branding

Rooting your software brand in things your user loves.

1.18.2020

se·mi·ot·ics

/ˌsemēˈädiks/

noun

  1. the study of signs and symbols and their use or interpretation.

In layman's terms, it means that certain things remind us of other things. Whether we like the certain thing is dependent upon whether we like the thing it reminds us of. More importantly, this varies from person to person and tribe to tribe.

After defining your software brand's personality, look, and feel, you can begin the hunt.

The hunt? Yes! The hunt.

The hunt for things that resemble those traits. They can be anywhere, you just have to find them. If possible, your ideal user will already have quite a few that you can reference. They're found in the things they eat, the clothes they wear, the gadgets they use, the movies they watch, the people they admire, and the beliefs they adhere to.

If you can find these things, apply their look, their language, and their attitude, then you are using semiotics to your advantage.

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