Guide Guidelines

How to make your customer the hero and your brand irreplaceable.

July 8, 2020

Your customers are the hero and they aren't looking for you to join them in the winner's circle, they are looking for someone to help them find the path there. Someone who has been in the winner's circle before, but is not seeking to stand within it this time around. A guide who can confidently help them get on track and succeed.

What qualities would make for someone to fit this role?

Two things: competence and empathy.

Competence, meaning the ability to go forth and complete a goal thoroughly, honestly, and ethically. Why? Because no one is going to want a guide with zero experience or one who cheats. They want someone who has been there already and succeeded honorably.

Empathy, because having been there already, the guide will know how difficult the challenges ahead are and knows what it feels like to be in their shoes.

Want to build an irreplaceable brand? Become a guide for your hero – err customer.

More you say?

Tortoise and Hare

Playing short games and long games

6.25.2020

Short term strategies: undercut competitors, have fire sales, adopt fads.

Long term strategy: build things that are useful and meaningful.

In branding, in sales, in everything planning for the long game ensures that you're given more time to play at all.

read more

Thievery in Action

Using your stolen identity in its full potential.

10.2.2020

You found an identity to steal. A theme that you can dive deep into and extract a visual story from. Now, your goal is to use these elements coherently. So much so, that even if your company's logo is absent from a piece of collateral, an ad, or website, it should still be recognized as something from you. Note, every design deliverable is different and the medium you are building within can have a major impact on how you will apply the visual identity. That being said, these are the top things to be aware of for cohesion:

Color

I cannot overstate the value of a unified color palette, especially if you've selected on unique to your market. Keeping your colors intact and uniform makes your company appear more organized and it helps establish a subconscious connection between you and the selected color. When cigarette advertising became prohibited, Marlboro paid bars to paint entire walls of their spaces Marlboro red. Their sales increased as a result. That's just from establishing a brand color. Or think about Tiffany Blue and the associations of prestige that come along with it. Color has major impact.

Typography

Of all the visual elements startups get wrong, this is most common. Type is both science and art, hell, some people dedicate their entire lives to the study and creation of beautiful letterforms. Point being, it ain't easy. But there are some overarching principles one should consider. Firstly, limit yourself. Pick two typefaces max and stick to them. Secondly, choose typefaces that are legible and timeless. No curly q's or any of that Microsoft WordArt shit that sends you back to 2nd grade. If you follow those two steps, your visual prowess will be 50% ahead of anyone not doing so.

Layout

Layout is the arrangement of elements on a design deliverable. Here is what you need to decide: does your brand reflect order and cleanliness or chaos and creativity? Both are good, but you need to pick one side. By establishing a game plan for how you will layout design elements, you can create templates for websites, presentations, ads, etc and they will all bear the same amount of order. If you bounce back and forth between hyper-create and hyper-structured you lose cohesion.

Subsequent Design Elements

This is where your stolen identity comes into play the most. Brand identities need spice, transcendent elements that make them unique. Let's say you decided to steal your visual identity from a Brooklyn pizza parlor. You know, a real-deal shop with red and white table cloths, twine-wrapped wine bottles, boisterous families talking across the table, Italian flags everywhere, and old-time, sepia-toned photos of the city. That is a treasure trove. You've got patterns (tablecloth), illustrations (of cool stuff like twine-wrapped wine bottles), voice and tone (boisterous families), photo styling (sepia-tone photos) all from one unified source. The same would apply to motion graphics (maybe a pizza being tossed in the air), icons, or any other element.

If you refuse to use the clichè icons, illustrations, and photos present within your industry and replace them with something out of context, you can make something impactful. You can tell a better story. It's all in your stolen identity. Unlock that treasure trove and create something awesome!

read more