F Word 2: Focused

If you chase two rabbits, you will catch neither.

September 22, 2020

Creative, entrepreneurial people have an innate desire to explore. After adopting a fearless attitude, it becomes easy for them to seek out newness and experiment with confidence. But, there is a shadow side to these seemingly harmless cravings of novelty: absent-minded innovation.

In part, it seems like this need to find something new or start several projects without finishing them stems from a need to grow. Be it more market share, more customers, more offerings, whatever. The point is that rebellious brands cannot afford to be all things to all people. Instead, they seek to focus.

I want you to think about taking a picture of somebody. You point your camera at them and they are blurry. The image sucks and your intention of capturing the moment is lost. Now focus on the subject. Clarity, definition, context, all of these things become evident in light of focus. You get the full picture.

Now try focusing on two people at different depths and distances. It gets much harder.

What's the point? In a world that cannot seem to satisfy its desire to be all things to all people, rebellious brands fearlessly focus. They are ok with gaining the full picture of one subject instead of trying to capture many.

More you say?

You feel me? | Software Branding

Finding the common ground that will elevate your brand.

1.18.2020

"Friendship is born at that moment when one person says to another: 'What! You too? I thought I was the only one!'"

-C.S. Lewis

When diving into knowing your user base, you will hopefully find common interest. In the things you both do, the things you listen to, who you respect, etc.

I would urge you to dive deeper. What do you both feel? What do you both wish was right in the world? What do you both believe?

If you can find this and communicate it you don't have to win people over, you end up rallying teammates to help you accomplish a goal. You are aligned.

A brand built on mutual values is set to flourish.

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Behind the Curtain

What a local SEO expert has shown me about trust and rebellion

12.13.2019

A week ago, I had spoken with a digital marketer who expressed concerns in working with a designer on websites. Main reason being that he had seen projects go awry because most designers don't care about the canonical structure of link building or using a website as a sales/marketing engine, they just want it to look pretty. When I probed for specific examples of problems designers had caused for him, he put up a wall and said, "you just need an SEO partner."

That didn't help me at all. It would be like me telling someone their branding sucked, not telling them why, and saying they need to work with me.

Still, it sounded like I needed a second opinion on my site structures and how using SEO could make these designs better. I reached out to my network and was referred to a guy named Tyler from Socratik, by a larger branding agency.

Oh man, it was like night and day. In an hour Tyler gave me a rundown of best SEO practices, showed me tools to use, and clued me in to some of his personal tips for building out content on websites. He lifted the curtain and showed me what went on behind the scenes. Needless to say, he earned a substantial amount of my trust and I will send anybody I meet that needs SEO services his way.

Now, what about rebellion? Tyler is a rebel. Here's why: I have not met an SEO strategist who was willing to sit down and talk shop like this, ever. Since rebellion is contextual, Tyler sticks out because he did something genuinely different than the rest of his peers. That is what makes him rebellious.

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