F Word 1: Fearless

Accepting failure is the first step in being rebellious.

September 21, 2020

During my month off from writing, I wrestled with the concept of rebellion. There is a vision in my head of what a rebellious brand looks like, but it's hard to detail. Naturally, it seemed smart to try and breakdown the term into sizable chunks that could be combined into something more concrete. I landed on three "F-Words," starting with Fearless.

Understanding what it means to be fearless starts with defining fear. Cue Webster:

/ˈfir/ an unpleasant emotion caused by the belief that someone or something is dangerous, likely to cause pain, or a threat.

In other words, fear is the looming awareness that things could go wrong. Unfortunately, our bodies can't help but be on the lookout for such threats because it is in our best interest to avoid pain. It's a primal function that enabled us to avoid meeting our doom at the jaws of sabretooth tigers and other adversaries hellbent on ending our existence. If that's the case, why is it so important for a rebellious brand to be fearless?

Cue Webster (again):

\ˈfir-ləs\ free from fear

In this instance, fear becomes a captor. A crushing slave merchant. Fear puts one in a cage and limits their potential.

Rebellion is anything but conventional or expected. It is a venture into the unknown and experimenting with what could be. A trip into chaos. To be fearless is to break free from the part of your lizard brain that tells you "this may be a bad idea, you might fail, you might get made fun of, people might reject you."

It is to liberate oneself from the chains of uncertainty. To understand that novelty, creativity, and change are found through a trial in the unknown. Most importantly, it is accepting that failure is necessary and to be expected in the search for greatness.

Rebels are not slaves to fear, they are free.

More you say?

Clock Blocked

Letting time passed dictate time to be had.

7.1.2020

A common worry of most startups is that they've let too much time go without focusing on their brand that it would be too late to make positive change.

This is the same feeling I had this morning. My back was super stiff so I slept in. Waking up to think, "damn, my daily routine might as well be ruined. I shouldn't exercise, I shouldn't write the MF Punch, I shouldn't pray, I shouldn't journal."

And then I thought, "so because I didn't get to these important habits of mine at the start of my day, that means they shouldn't manifest at all?"

No.

What's the point?

Don't let your brand be clock blocked. If you expect your startup to be around at the end of the day, end of the week, end of year, whatever, you can make a change for the better right now.

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Your Favorite Competitor

There is always one brand your startup can beat. You see them all the time, you know their weaknesses more than anyone else.

11.26.2019

The startup world is cut throat. It seems like there is always some kind of monstrous competitor lurking around the corner ready to devour your company. At least, this is what a scarcity mindset would reinforce.

The sad thing is that even if that monster is beaten there is another one ready to take its place. Concerns about competitors are like a hydra. Cut off one head and two more take its place.

What are we to do?

Walk past them. Don't engage. Your brand has one enemy and that is who it was yesterday. The bliss embedded within such a mindset is that whether you win or lose, it's all up to you.

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