Design Compass

How to get amazing work from your designer.

October 22, 2020

Good creative is hard to come by. There are a lot of designers out there, but few of them can focus their talents toward other people's goals. More importantly, if they are given a set of to-do's, their talent dries up from micromanagement. The solution? A compass.

Yes, by golly, a compass. A special compass. One that you and your designer come up with together. A north star guiding the decisions made and inspiring your designer to keep moving.

What goes into a compass? Context, expected outcomes, boundaries, and aspiration. A good designer will take these and run. Wanna get good work? Make a design compass.

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Defining the Brand

The steps needed to define the brand.

9.29.2020

Let's set the record straight: brand = gut-feeling. Done. No if's, and's, or but's. The brand is the emotional resonance someone has with an entity. More importantly, the brand manifests itself differently in each person who forms an emotional connection. Your job as the founder of a company or the person responsible for brand management is to ensure that the feelings are not disparate.

Why? Because if an emotional connection is established, a business will recoup more customers, at a greater value, for a longer amount of time. Cult-like brand followers are hard-pressed to leave their brand of choice. Where this becomes an issue is when the mood shifts frequently (i.e. voice and tone misalignment, a rash, "salesy" email, negative customer experiences).

So how do you know if something is off-base for the brand? You define it. Usually in the form of a purpose and brand personality. You see this all the time. McDonald's focuses on happiness, while Jack in the Box focuses on comedy and poking fun at the establishment. It's why McDonald's creates Happy Meals for smiling children while Jack in the Box creates Munchie Meals for stoned college students.

Point is, both of these brands are defined and manifest in visual identity and even in the marketing initiatives they take.

Here are the questions I ask founders to extract a brand:

1. Your company dies twenty years from now, what is on the tombstone?

This practice sets your gaze on the future and how people will remember you and your impact. Pretend you are giving a eulogy for your beloved company.

2. KYC. Know your customer intimately.

Beyond demographics. Walk a day in their shoes. What goals do they have? What keeps them up at night? What is making them seek your help? What's at stake? What do they love? What patterns can you derive from their lifestyle?

3. Trends

What macro movements are having an impact on your industry? Is there one that you can use to propel your positioning?

4. What is missing in your industry?

Take a look at the alternatives your customer has to your company, what is missing? What irritates your customer with these alternatives? How can you be different emotionally? How can you be different tactically and in your offerings?

5. Who are you?

Yes, you, the founder with an amazing story. Whether you believe it or not, your story has an impact on your brand and you need to put it on paper. Where are you from? Where are you now? What does that say about you?

6. What qualifies you?

What puts your company in a position of authority to lead your customer to their goals? What helps you empathize with their current predicament?

7. Brand Attributes

Describe the culture, customers, voice and tone, feeling (post-interaction), and impact of the brand. Simple, one-word answers work best.

8. Establish a brand archetype

I like to use this cheat sheet.

9. Mission

What do you offer?

10. Vision

How has your customer changed after working with you?

11. Purpose

Why you do what you do.

These questions go deep. Don't be satisfied with surface-level answers. Dive into them. Think them over. It's ok to take time. Most importantly, be honest and don't be afraid to tell your story, it has more impact than you know. Remember, if you do not establish this foundation, no messaging or visuals will ever feel right.

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Defining "Brand"

Setting the record straight on a trendy and frequently misused term.

4.28.2020

The most common answer a startup will give to "what is a brand," is something along the lines of "logo," or a "visual representation of your company." While the visuals are a key part in making a brand, they do not describe its entirety. Marty Neumeier, author of the Brand Gap describes it this way:

The brand is a gut feeling. It's an emotion felt by someone after interacting with an entity, usually a business.

What is a brand? A gut-feeling, don't let anyone else tell you otherwise.

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