Demographics in Branding

Creating the foundation for a focused brand.

November 2, 2020

Demographics are the first piece discussed in understanding who your target audience is. Mainly because they don't require as much critical thinking and are evident without much additional thought/analysis. Here is a list of the attributes that one would include in the demographics of their target audience:

  • Sex
  • Age
  • Geography
  • Marital Status
  • Education
  • Employment/Occupation

What purpose do these pieces of information help us solve in creating a brand? Well, the answer is quite simple: you are going to talk to people differently and through different mediums based on these answers. More importantly, knowing the demographics of this ideal superfan enables you to focus on who will be using your products/services.

Target One:

  • Sex: Female
  • Age: 34
  • Geography: Wichita, Kansas
  • Marital Status: Married with two kids
  • Education: Bachelor's in English Literature
  • Employment: Columnist for a local magazine / $80,000 per year

Target Two:

  • Sex: Female
  • Age: 23
  • Geography: Santa Monica, California
  • Marital Status: Single
  • Education: Bachelor's in Nursing
  • Employment: RN for local hospital / $66,000 per year

Even with these descriptions alone, it is clear that the lifestyles and day-to-day happenings in these persons' lives are going to be different. They will have different preferences, lifestyles, beliefs, cares, aspirations, etc. We start with these demographics because it allows us to put up the blinders to other groups that are not as important to the brand being created.

More you say?

Treadmill

When you want different results.

3.9.2020

It's astonishing the amount of business owners and sales people who want to be better. They want more customers, they want higher value customers, more of anything that will help them get to the next level. Where this gets interesting is how few of them are willing to do something different to make an impact.

They repeat the same message they have for years, fear to break the mold, but expect that things will change. They pour countless amounts of dollars into marketing, expecting that somehow the same old message will get through.

It's like running on a treadmill. No matter how fast you go, you stay in the same place. If you want to go somewhere you have to run in unconfined territory. You have to break free of what's already there.

Applying this to your brand: say something different, look different, act different, be different. Change.

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Keep the Plane Flying | Software Branding

How design and branding impacts each part of a software business, referencing Donald Miller's Plan Analogy

1.18.2020

In his latest book, Business Made Simple, Donald Miller regales readers with the analogy of a business as an airplane.

The Plane Body is Overhead
It's filled with people and those people weigh down the plane with cost.

The Wings are Products and Services
These are the things that give a company lift and can allow the air to get under it.

The Engines are Sales and Marketing
These propel the company forward and allow for increased velocity. Allowing the plane to take on more overhead and go more places.

The Fuel is Cashflow
Run out of this stuff and you crash.

Here's how design and branding fits in to all of these:

Overhead
The people who work for you will earn their keep if they are guided by a strong mission. Something that inspires them to get out of bed, go to work, and make shit happen. You enable that to happen when you have a strong emotional value they cling to. That's your brand. Good people are expensive, however their ROI is worth it. Give them a reason to push the company forward with a strong brand.

Products and Services
In software, a poorly designed product will kill a company. Do it right. Make it something your sales people want to sell, rather than being forced to sell it. More importantly, add pieces of delight throughout all of these so that the product becomes irreplaceable to your users. That is design.

Sales and Marketing
Following up on the previous point, a well designed product is one your sales team is encouraged to offer. Make your product appear trustworthy by branding your marketing efforts and getting the word out in an exciting, useful manner. Make it easy for customers to recognize and like you. That is design thinking 101.

Cashflow
If you're running low and need to rally investors to your cause, design a mission for them to get behind. Articulate it uniquely and in a way that is easily understood. Create a deck that is trusted at a glance and represents your company well.

Apply your brand and design the part of your business accordingly so that you can go anywhere.

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