Demographics in Branding

Creating the foundation for a focused brand.

November 2, 2020

Demographics are the first piece discussed in understanding who your target audience is. Mainly because they don't require as much critical thinking and are evident without much additional thought/analysis. Here is a list of the attributes that one would include in the demographics of their target audience:

  • Sex
  • Age
  • Geography
  • Marital Status
  • Education
  • Employment/Occupation

What purpose do these pieces of information help us solve in creating a brand? Well, the answer is quite simple: you are going to talk to people differently and through different mediums based on these answers. More importantly, knowing the demographics of this ideal superfan enables you to focus on who will be using your products/services.

Target One:

  • Sex: Female
  • Age: 34
  • Geography: Wichita, Kansas
  • Marital Status: Married with two kids
  • Education: Bachelor's in English Literature
  • Employment: Columnist for a local magazine / $80,000 per year

Target Two:

  • Sex: Female
  • Age: 23
  • Geography: Santa Monica, California
  • Marital Status: Single
  • Education: Bachelor's in Nursing
  • Employment: RN for local hospital / $66,000 per year

Even with these descriptions alone, it is clear that the lifestyles and day-to-day happenings in these persons' lives are going to be different. They will have different preferences, lifestyles, beliefs, cares, aspirations, etc. We start with these demographics because it allows us to put up the blinders to other groups that are not as important to the brand being created.

More you say?

Who Cares?

An excerpt from Obviously Awesome, part IV.

5.29.2020

This is the fourth article in a small series of punches surrounding April Dunford's Obviously Awesome! and how good positioning relates to good branding. Please read the first article, second article, and third article, before jumping into this one.

Enjoy!

You know what the alternatives are, you know the special things that your startup unique, and you've established what makes that valuable. All of these are great, but fall to pieces if no one buys.

The first approach most startups will take in finding customers is shotgunning any and every kind of market. Decent plan of action if you have time to experiment. Truth is, hardly anyone is capable of making this happen effectively, especially when concerned with time. It makes sense to be hyper-focused and test with less variables that you can either pursue further or pivot away from.

Why?

Because you need to communicate and trigger a response from someone who cares. Someone who feels that the solution you bring to the table is worth more than the dollars they will pay for it.

How do you do that? You think about them and craft messages around them that fit within their lifestyle.

What kind of person are they? Where do they work? What do they do for fun? What about their life sucks that they want to fix? Your goal is to get to know someone and find out if the solution you provide is of use to them. If not, it might be time to switch.

Tactically, you can do this with interviews within a particular segment or you can think of aspirational personas. The point is to have someone to make stuff for and be targeted. You're chances of hitting something become a lot higher if you know what you're aiming for.

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Arbitrary Deadlines | Software Branding

Why deadlines are a bad idea and not worthwhile.

1.18.2020

You ever notice how Apple never says "iPhone will be released at the end of this year." Why? Because good products do not have a deadline. Deadlines are arbitrary and no one, except you and your team care about them. What users want is a good product, something worth more than having an "ok" product by a specific timeline.

The point? A good team is going to work as fast and efficiently as possible to get a good product. Let them work toward goals rather than arbitrary due dates.

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