Defining the Brand

The steps needed to define the brand.

September 29, 2020

Let's set the record straight: brand = gut-feeling. Done. No if's, and's, or but's. The brand is the emotional resonance someone has with an entity. More importantly, the brand manifests itself differently in each person who forms an emotional connection. Your job as the founder of a company or the person responsible for brand management is to ensure that the feelings are not disparate.

Why? Because if an emotional connection is established, a business will recoup more customers, at a greater value, for a longer amount of time. Cult-like brand followers are hard-pressed to leave their brand of choice. Where this becomes an issue is when the mood shifts frequently (i.e. voice and tone misalignment, a rash, "salesy" email, negative customer experiences).

So how do you know if something is off-base for the brand? You define it. Usually in the form of a purpose and brand personality. You see this all the time. McDonald's focuses on happiness, while Jack in the Box focuses on comedy and poking fun at the establishment. It's why McDonald's creates Happy Meals for smiling children while Jack in the Box creates Munchie Meals for stoned college students.

Point is, both of these brands are defined and manifest in visual identity and even in the marketing initiatives they take.

Here are the questions I ask founders to extract a brand:

1. Your company dies twenty years from now, what is on the tombstone?

This practice sets your gaze on the future and how people will remember you and your impact. Pretend you are giving a eulogy for your beloved company.

2. KYC. Know your customer intimately.

Beyond demographics. Walk a day in their shoes. What goals do they have? What keeps them up at night? What is making them seek your help? What's at stake? What do they love? What patterns can you derive from their lifestyle?

3. Trends

What macro movements are having an impact on your industry? Is there one that you can use to propel your positioning?

4. What is missing in your industry?

Take a look at the alternatives your customer has to your company, what is missing? What irritates your customer with these alternatives? How can you be different emotionally? How can you be different tactically and in your offerings?

5. Who are you?

Yes, you, the founder with an amazing story. Whether you believe it or not, your story has an impact on your brand and you need to put it on paper. Where are you from? Where are you now? What does that say about you?

6. What qualifies you?

What puts your company in a position of authority to lead your customer to their goals? What helps you empathize with their current predicament?

7. Brand Attributes

Describe the culture, customers, voice and tone, feeling (post-interaction), and impact of the brand. Simple, one-word answers work best.

8. Establish a brand archetype

I like to use this cheat sheet.

9. Mission

What do you offer?

10. Vision

How has your customer changed after working with you?

11. Purpose

Why you do what you do.

These questions go deep. Don't be satisfied with surface-level answers. Dive into them. Think them over. It's ok to take time. Most importantly, be honest and don't be afraid to tell your story, it has more impact than you know. Remember, if you do not establish this foundation, no messaging or visuals will ever feel right.

More you say?

What do you have for me?

Understanding what exactly your user is coming to you for.

11.9.2020

After defining the demographics of your ideal user, you can dive deeper into what exactly they are coming to your company for.

Where to start? Think of it like a story. Chances are, there is some catalyzing event that has made them seek a solution. For example, they need to be more productive, they are tired of resetting their password, they have acne, they want to be healthier, etc. In short, what is the fire under their ass?

Secondly, you pair that fire with an extinguisher. Namely, this would be in the form of your product, a specific feature you have, or a service you provide.

This is the first step to tangibly expressing your brand through what you offer. Furthermore, in a way that is relevant to your target user.

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Building a Visual Identity

The things needed to craft a cohesive and unique brand identity.

9.28.2020

Crafting a brand identity is fun and it can skyrocket a startup's legitimacy. But it's hard. Especially if you're jumping into it for the first time without a whole lot of experience or direction. So here are some steps that I'll be expanding on later this week. This initial run is an effort to get these thoughts out of my head and on to something tangible.

1. Establish and define the brand

The brand is the gut feeling someone has about an entity. Without defining what this feeling is, it's impossible to craft visuals that are aligned with it. The route to this definition comes from asking a lot of questions, empathizing with who would love this company the most, and precisely detailing the personality of the company. Think of it as creating a movie character. You want to know them intimately.

2. Seek, steal, and repurpose

Visual identities are often relegated to what I call the "design aesthetic." The design aesthetic doesn't have a unique personality to it but has good command over whitespace and simple layouts. While there isn't anything wrong with utilizing those design principles, establishing an emotional connection is contingent upon a humanistic element. Something unique, tasteful, and appropriate. The design aesthetic is a fail-safe for those who do not have a deeper story or who are afraid to be something different. As such, they try to create something on their own and fall into the design aesthetic trap.

What's the antidote? Find inspiration (from a book, a movie, a place, another brand), steal as much as you can, and repurpose the elements for your brand. Something inspiring and impactful already out there, magic happens when you place it in a new context.

3. Establish visual elements

There are foundational elements in every identity build. Namely, color, typography, layout, logo, and subsequent elements like illustration, pattern, photography, iconography, and motion. Once a visual theme has been set, the task is now to apply that theme to these elements so there is a cohesive look to everything. It's been phrased before that any piece of collateral should be recognizable without the brand's logo on it. This is done by aligning and consistently using branded visuals.

4. Flex and be ready to adapt

Change is inevitable. Prepare yourself to move and adapt your visual identity as time progresses. New mediums will arise, styles will change, your company will change, and eventually, your visuals will need to as well. Be prepared to flex, experiment, and change.

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