Custom Projects = Custom Prices

Understanding why design work has relative pricing and when it can be productized.

May 15, 2020

Alright, say you want a logo for your startup. For an experienced designer, this has a streamlined process as well as varying tiers of engagement. They also have a rate for which they will carry these services out. Unless added variables outside of these packages are added, the price shouldn't change that much.

Now say you want a custom e-commerce website, with a bunch of third party integrations, some help on copy, sourcing photos and icons, and then recurring maintenance. You don't know how many pages there are, who is responsible for a lot of the things that will go into the site, it's all custom.

Here's the thing, some design work can be structured within a detailed process. Projects like that should have fixed prices based on the value the designer is bringing to the table. Projects that are unique and require just as much planning as they do execution get custom prices.

In the instance of the latter, it makes sense to dedicate 10% of the estimated budget to getting three, tiered, custom options.

More you say?

Fast and Good

You cannot wait for lightning to strike.

5.14.2020

Design seems to have a drawn out and lengthy process. I don't know about you, but I really don't like it. Especially if you're working with startups that need to move fast. How do you fix it? You work together, show the ugly, and focus on getting a bunch of guesswork eliminated.

If you can move fast, you're good at what you do, and you can coach people through the process, this shouldn't be an issue.

This applies to everything. Logos, websites, apps, collateral. Hammer out as much of the details in low-fidelity form as possible.

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Know Yourself

Communicating a message to others about how you are different is impossible without introspection

11.22.2019

Building a brand is about connecting people to a company at an emotional level. What do people connect with? Other people and their stories. No matter how lame and uneventful you believe your journey to have been, your story as a founder, entrepreneur, and business person is exciting to someone else who has never lived it. Every detail is a new experience for them.

For example, I've lived in San Diego my whole life. Naturally, the beach and amazing weather don't surprise or excite me anymore because I've seen them so much. But to someone who lives in Canada who has never seen a wave, felt sand between their toes, or spent an entire day playing beach volleyball, it's completely foreign and interesting to them.

Set aside your products for a second and think about your story. Where are you from? Where are you now? What does that say about you? Lastly, how can you embed that story into your brand?

The brand of a startup is almost always a mirror of the founder. If you want to build a stellar brand, you must know yourself first.

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