Coffee Filter

Why original ideas are not as good as stolen ideas.

May 6, 2020

FYI, I stole this concept and story from Sprint by Jake Knapp, enjoy!

I don't drink coffee, but I'd imagine the most people wouldn't if they had to drink coffee without using coffee filters. You see, before the filter coffee was brewed the same way you'd steep a bag of tea. The result was a lot of over-brewed, grit filled, coffee. Gross.

Filters had been attempted before, but to no avail. They were made of cloth.

It wasn't until a woman named Melitta Bentz saw blotting paper on her son's desk that the idea for our modern filters came to her. Blotting paper was used to clean up excess ink , it was porous enough to let liquid pass, but not enough to let the gritty grounds come through. Sure enough, after using it in place of cloth, she was astounded. The flavor was great and clean up was a snap.

What does this have to do with branding?

Sometimes the obvious solution to your brand isn't where you'd expect. You won't find it looking at competitors or digging within the muck of your day-to-day, it's somewhere else. Perhaps it's a different industry, or in a game you used to play, your favorite movie, a song. Instead of trying to create the perfect brand, find it and repurpose it.

More you say?

Stop Being Professional

How being professional kills your brand.

3.26.2020

Alright, let's make sure we're on the same page, as one of the biggest issues with being professional is lack of concrete definition. You probably think of professional as suit and tie, clean cut, and stoic. But that's bogus. And it is off-base for what the actual definition of professional would entail.

Professional /prəˈfeSH(ə)n(ə)l/:

relating to or connected with a profession.
"young professional people"

engaged in a specified activity as one's main paid occupation rather than as a pastime.
"a professional boxer"

a person engaged or qualified in a profession.
"professionals such as lawyers and surveyors"

Nothing in those definitions implies that one has to give up their personality, character, or style to be a professional. It seems that the only defining characteristic would be the practice of a specific activity that one gets paid for. You could pop pimples for a living and you'd still be considered a professional, so long as you get paid for it. Do you hear that? So long as you do a job and get paid for it, you are a professional. You don't have to wear a suit, you don't have to refrain from saying what you think or using slang, you have to provide something deemed valuable to be a professional.

Why do I want you to stop being "professional?" Because you box yourself in with your definition (the clean cut, suit and tie version). It makes you boring and totally diminishes the elements of your personality that make you special. Granted, this doesn't mean you should stop taking care of yourself or give the impression that you aren't put together, but that's not a hard standard to meet. If you wear a nice, unwrinkled t-shirt with a good pair of jeans, and sneakers, no one is going to think you're a slob. If they do, screw 'em. They are clearly not supposed to do business with you, but instead with someone who takes pride in posturing themselves to look wealthy rather than doing good work.

Stop trying to be professional and instead double down on being yourself, whatever that means. If you like getting dressed up, go for it! But don't let those fancy clothes become a shock collar that stops you from being yourself, telling your jokes, and saying what you feel is right.

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MVPs and MVCs | Software Branding

Applying the same agile mindset of an MVP to branding.

1.13.2020

When you start building a product, your first goal is to make sure it works. It doesn't need all the bells and whistles you anticipate it will house in the future, only the most important ones. The ones that will set you apart and lay the foundation for everything your product could become.

This is referred to as your MVP (minimum viable product).

In constructing a brand for your software, taking a similar approach is essential. Specifically, you build a brand around a specific user base. It doesn't cover everyone you anticipate this product could serve, only the ones who would find it most valuable. The ones who will see you as set apart from any other option they have.

This would be referred to as your MVC (most valued customer).

By focusing on them and them alone, you can tailor your messaging, your identity, your marketing, everything you do is focused around them. Which is helpful, given that it is impossible speak with impact to a generalized crowd.

Have the courage to focus on your most valued customer. They will thank you for it and you'll make something amazing as a result.

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