Bad Names = Bad Identities

The one thing you need to clear up before you start working on a visual identity.

October 13, 2020

The Nike swoosh, the Apple apple, the Target bullseye. All of these logos are recognizable in an instant and yes, it took a while for them to get there, but there is a common thread between them oft-overlooked in the success of their brand identities:

They have good names.

Since the name of a brand is further up in the headwaters than the logo, it makes sense that a crappy name will hinder the success of the visual identity. Don't believe me? Well, let's try these with different monikers.

Nike -> Elegant Running Solutions.
A swoosh would not fare well under this.

Apple -> Creative Computers, Inc.
Why the hell is the logo an apple?

Target -> Minneapolis Market (Target started in this city)
The bullseye loses all gusto.

You get the picture. Brand identities, just like people's identities include a lot from the name. Why do you think authors and screenwriters obsess over the names of these characters they create? It matters and there is an emotional value to the name of a company.

If you don't nail your name and have it aligned with the emotional value you want to manifest within your audience, your identity as a whole will suffer. How do you do that?

Define your brand.

More you say?

Iceberg

The core elements to building a solid brand identity.

1.16.2020

A brand identity is the elements that make up a brand's manifestation in the tangible world; things we can see, touch, smell, taste, and hear. It's commonly limited to a logo, and while a logo is an essential piece, it's the tip of the iceberg. What lies beneath the surface is what gives it the ability to rise above the surface.

Defining the brand
The entire purpose of brand identity is to have tangible manifestations of the gut feeling you intend people to have about your business. So, you must first define it. This is done through a brand discovery. If done right, these collaborative sessions between a branding expert and client unearth the business' values, story, voice and tone, purpose, and how they are different from their competitors.

Auditing the brand
Upon defining the brand, the branding expert and client will go through the current branding efforts of the business and check for alignment. This involves everything from marketing collateral, stationery, social media posts, email newsletters, the name of the company, even the services and pricing are on the table. The key is that regardless of the touchpoint, all elements must point to the defined brand. Anything misaligned is put up for redesign.

Brand Identity Design
This is where the foundation of the brand's look is laid. It involves the creation of a name (if needed), a logo, color palette, typography, photo styling, illustration and pattern examples, and iconography.

Brand Expansion
With the core elements of the brand identity laid out, marketing collateral, a website, and other touchpoints can be created without looking scattered.

Here's where this goes wrong: when you try to build the top of the iceberg without giving it the support it needs.

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Vibranium Shield Branding

What a superhero's tool of choice says about branding design.

6.24.2020

In Marvel's Captain America: the First Avenger, Steve Rogers is transformed from a scrawny pipsqueak into the formidable super-soldier, Captain America.

After completing a successful rescue mission using nothing but a stage-prop shield, famous inventor and colleague, Howard Stark offers to improve upon the shield design.

He presents Rogers with a dozen different designs, some outfitted with electronics to zap his adversaries, some with spikes and other baggage. He glances on the ground and picks up a round disc.

"What's it made of?" he asks.

"That's vibranium, it's completely vibration absorbent." say's Stark.

After being put through a spur of the moment bullet deflection test, courtesy of an angry love-interest, Rogers chooses the shield and gives it a fresh paint job to match his uniform.

That was in 1944.

Fast forward into 2020 and the same shield is used in later battles without losing its gusto or its alignment with Cap's identity.

Why? Because it was a simple, elegant, and timeless choice. Unhindered by fads, excess, or things that would weigh it down.

The point? treat branding design the same way. Don't be bogged down by choices simply because they are popular today, aim for something genuinely useful and timeless.

The clip from the movie, for you poor souls who haven't seen it.

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