Answer this Question

A rich gem to figure out what your brand really means to people.

July 30, 2020

If you're having rouble figuring out what your brand means to someone, try answering this question from a customers perspective:

"Three years from now, they are sitting down enjoying coffee, really happy with the progress they've got from doing business with you. What has made them so happy?"

If you can answer this, or get answers to this question, you will have a leg up on any alternative in your path.

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Interesting Proposition | Software Branding

Affecting the life of a particular person is the key to being irreplaceable.

1.18.2020

Being better is a unsellable proposition. Better is subjective in nature, difficult to see from the outside, and even harder to define.

For example, Webflow is a web design tool. So are WordPress, Squarespace, Wix, and Weebly. Which one is better? Well, it depends on who you are asking.

Webflow's proposition is that they are a web design tool for designers. Specifically, designers who work within a hybrid engineering-like role and can think in systems. Squarespace is also for designers who don't care about code quality and are instead focused on making things look pretty and working fast. WordPress is not for designers at all and is catered toward those who want as many features as possible regardless of code quality.

The point? The person that you anticipate to use your software is who will guide features, prioritize them, and dictate which ones are misnomers.

That is how you create an interesting proposition.

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Write for humans

SEO strategists are going to hate me for writing this.

12.20.2019

The obsession people have with SEO is mind boggling. It's as if SEO is a silver bullet to make up for having an undefined audience and not knowing what they want. I've seen a lot of marketers and the work that they produce. Most of the time, I'm disappointed because it's obvious what game they are playing. They write keyword stuffed blogs with no soul and refuse to write copy that engages people on an emotional level in the hopes of pointing Google searchers to a page.

It's not that I believe all content should be that way, but in order to actually connect with someone so they convert on your page, you can't write for a search engine. Search engines operate entirely on rationale, humans invest emotionally.

As such, both creative messaging and effective SEO need to be in harmony. You can write for search engines until you're blue in the face, but a search engine is not going to have the emotional nuance as the human who will be making a buying decision. You have to trigger them beyond having all the right keywords on your site.

If I had to put my finger on specific things that focusing solely on writing for search engines fails to consider, it'd be these two things:

  1. Keywords and other elements search engines take into account are replicable. If you can do it, so can your competitors and it will not help customers make a decision because you will sound exactly the same.
  2. Writing and creating content for search engines rarely makes for anything engaging, exciting, or different. However, it's these qualities that encourage people to share what they find regardless of whether Google likes it or not.

In short, make awesome content for humans. If possible, make it search engine friendly.

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