Actions Speak Louder Than H1s

The brand that pays attention to the needs and wants of their ideal customer wins

December 12, 2019

In my newsletters, I do a segment every month called the Brand Spotlight. Within these emails, I go over a brands positioning, messaging, visuals, crafted experiences, and what could be improved. Today, I was able to speak with my good friend, Melinda Livsey, about a recommended brand for the spotlight: Thuma.

Thuma sells bed frames. Really nice, easy to assemble bed frames.

When Melinda and I were discussing the things that made the brand impactful to her, we centered their success on one thing: the intention and thought that was put into every aspect of their experience makes them worth a premium and telling others about. Thuma showed they cared through their website, their product design, their packaging, instructions, and delivering on their promise as an easy to assemble product.

Think about it, if you encounter an amazing experience, even if it's more costly, you will tell others about it. In turn, putting more resources into the experience your customers have makes it so you don't have to spend so much on advertising. You've already paid for it by creating something worth telling others about.

The headline (H1) on your site could be the most SEO friendly on the planet, but it will not outdo a pleasant, worthwhile experience.

More you say?

Arbitrary Deadlines | Software Branding

Why deadlines are a bad idea and not worthwhile.

1.18.2020

You ever notice how Apple never says "iPhone will be released at the end of this year." Why? Because good products do not have a deadline. Deadlines are arbitrary and no one, except you and your team care about hem. What users want is a good product, something worth more than having an "ok" product by a specific timeline.

The point? A good team is going to work as fast and efficiently as possible to get a good product. Let them work toward goals rather than arbitrary due dates.

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Is Your Product Sick? | Software Branding

I had some bad shrimp and thought of a branding analogy.

1.8.2020

My roommate made some shrimp last night and offered me some. After my first bite I could tell this wasn't gonna be something that made my stomach feel good, so I scrapped the rest. Waking up this morning, it was even clearer that something wasn't right. I didn't feel like eating anything else, as if my body was illuminating a "no vacancy" sign over my stomach.

So, I listened. My body was feeling sick and needed to (putting it euphorically) expel or fix everything that was making it feel bad. If I'd tried cramming more food in my belly to ease the gurgles, it wouldn't have ended well and I'd have a bigger mess to clean up.

It leads to the question, are you treating your product the same way?

Are you forcing more features to make up for those that are making your product sick?

Are you trying to gain more users when the ones you have aren't close to satisfied?

Are you trying to expand your brand without first solidifying it?

Take time and make your product healthy before you starting filling it with more.

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