A Little Bit of Courage and Color | Software Branding

Choosing good brand colors for your software has risk and reward.

January 7, 2021

It takes balls to do something unexpected and different. In the case of choosing brand colors for your software, this is most evident and it matters greatly. Color is one of the core ways your brand coheres its marketing efforts, expresses itself, and distinguishes your brand from competitors.

Uber demonstrated this well during their rebrand in 2018. The black and white base of their brand colors allowed them to expand their marketing efforts globally and uniformly while shifting the focus to rich photography of their users. Difficult to do if you're playing with a myriad of colors.

Compared to their largest competitor, Lyft, who bolsters a hot pink badge of courage, the Uber color palette connotes feelings of maturity, elitism, and professionalism. A smart move in trying to distance themselves from the hyper-friendly and childish Lyft.

What's cool is that the flip-side of this is also true and valid for Lyft's color choices. It takes just as much fortitude to come up with the hot pinks, poppin' purples, and other vibrant hues that construct their energetic and playful appearance. There is no way you'd mistake ads from either brand for each other, in large part due to color.

The point? Have the courage to use color boldly and to stake your claim emotionally. Use it often, with confidence, and throughout your product as well as the pieces that sell it.

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Criticism is one thing, but the ability to articulate what could be done better is something else

12.5.2019

I spoke with a digital marketer yesterday and he had expressed concerns working with designer on websites. He'd seen the results go haywire in the past from an SEO perspective because most designers use tools like Squarespace and Wix without considering how their pretty site will play into the overall digital strategy.

When I pushed for specific problems, the only answer I got was, "you need an SEO partner," which is pretty convenient considering that's what he does.

Here's the thing: if there is truly a better way to do something, it is your job to articulate those details to someone in need of your help, especially if they are willing to learn.

If you're a chiropractor and you don't share your method for making others feel better or coach them, how will they trust you?

What about a SaaS startup that doesn't educate users on how to use their platform?

A designer that doesn't articulate why a design is flawed and coach better design practices?

There is no trust built up keeping your knowledge behind closed doors. If you are an expert, prove it. Better yet, teach it.

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Interesting Proposition | Software Branding

Affecting the life of a particular person is the key to being irreplaceable.

1.18.2020

Being better is a unsellable proposition. Better is subjective in nature, difficult to see from the outside, and even harder to define.

For example, Webflow is a web design tool. So are WordPress, Squarespace, Wix, and Weebly. Which one is better? Well, it depends on who you are asking.

Webflow's proposition is that they are a web design tool for designers. Specifically, designers who work within a hybrid engineering-like role and can think in systems. Squarespace is also for designers who don't care about code quality and are instead focused on making things look pretty and working fast. WordPress is not for designers at all and is catered toward those who want as many features as possible regardless of code quality.

The point? The person that you anticipate to use your software is who will guide features, prioritize them, and dictate which ones are misnomers.

That is how you create an interesting proposition.

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