A Little Bit of Courage and Color | Software Branding

Choosing good brand colors for your software has risk and reward.

January 7, 2021

It takes balls to do something unexpected and different. In the case of choosing brand colors for your software, this is most evident and it matters greatly. Color is one of the core ways your brand coheres its marketing efforts, expresses itself, and distinguishes your brand from competitors.

Uber demonstrated this well during their rebrand in 2018. The black and white base of their brand colors allowed them to expand their marketing efforts globally and uniformly while shifting the focus to rich photography of their users. Difficult to do if you're playing with a myriad of colors.

Compared to their largest competitor, Lyft, who bolsters a hot pink badge of courage, the Uber color palette connotes feelings of maturity, elitism, and professionalism. A smart move in trying to distance themselves from the hyper-friendly and childish Lyft.

What's cool is that the flip-side of this is also true and valid for Lyft's color choices. It takes just as much fortitude to come up with the hot pinks, poppin' purples, and other vibrant hues that construct their energetic and playful appearance. There is no way you'd mistake ads from either brand for each other, in large part due to color.

The point? Have the courage to use color boldly and to stake your claim emotionally. Use it often, with confidence, and throughout your product as well as the pieces that sell it.

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Who do you want to help? | Software Branding

Positioning your software to be impactful.

1.12.2020

Softwares can help a lot of people in many different ways. Which is another way of saying, there is an infinite number of replacements for your product. Venmo does the same thing as Paypal, Mailchimp does the same thing as SendGrid, Freshbooks does the same thing as Quickbooks, and Notion does the same thing as Asana.

How do you stand out? You decide to help someone specific.

If your software can help anyone, then you have your pick of the litter and can make the decision to build something special for someone.

"But won't I get bored or lose the opportunity to expand?"

Doubtful. There is so much hidden need for specific user groups that the list of new features and ideas to make your ideal user's life easier are endless. Plus, you can always expand once you've exhausted your initial market or duplicate your tech for another market with slight modification.

Doing so makes you irreplaceable, makes it easy to market and sell, and makes it easy to build an awesome brand. Why? Because you are able to focus rather than constantly chasing shiny objects.

It takes courage, but if you can answer the question, "who do you want to help?" Building your brand will get immensely easier.

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I Don't Bill Hourly

Here's why:

10.19.2020

"We imagine this will take 20 hours of work."

Well, I can imagine quite a bit too. I can imagine the work would take 4 hours and that would be something, wouldn't it? I can also imagine it going over 20 hours, which would be a real bummer because we'd lose time.

What's the point? No one knows how long projects take. Billing by the hour puts the risk in my client's hands, since anything that takes longer than we'd initially planned becomes their problem instead of mine.That's not the kind of assurance I want to provide.

Sure, it could be easier to just keep the clock running and send a bill, but that is conformity. That is being unsure of how good you are as professional and being unable to create innovate solutions for clients. Billing hourly is not the rebel way.

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