A Few of Their Favorite Things | Software Branding

Aligning your software brand with your most valued customers.

January 14, 2021

Chances are, your brand is already out in the world.

What? Yes! It is. Your brand is the emotional value people attribute to your company, value they already find in many other things throughout their day.

For example, if you want your brand to be seen as happy, joyful, youthful, and teeming zest for life, I bet your ideal users experience this in other places. Perhaps it's from an ice cream shop, a children's author, or a TV Show. The point is that somewhere out there is a prime example of these attributes. The same would be said of any other adjective as well: elite, progressive, friendly, serious, stoic, sarcastic, brave, funny, classic, you get the point.

Your job in building a brand for your most valued customers is to understand what emotions are missing from the market category you want to enter, research places these emotions are found within your customer's life, and steal the things that make them memorable.

Seriously, steal them. Steal the colors, steal the phrases, steal the pictures, steal the shapes, steal the experience as much as you can.

Why is this effective? Because you are taking something familiar and placing it into a new context. This is the recipe for novelty.

Happy stealing.

More you say?

Blind Branding

Remove visuals from the equation, do you have a brand?

3.5.2020

Most startup founders associate branding with identity design (logos, color, patterns, etc.). While visuals are an important part of the branding process, it isn't everything. In fact, they are the last step taken.

It stands to reason that your logo is not your brand, and your brand is not your logo. Period.

Logos are symbols, a brand is a feeling. Specifically, the feeling one would associate with your company.

Think of it this way, if a blind individual could not see your logo, but they could hear the things you say and how you want to make an impact on the world, would they understand who you are? Or would they be presented a shallow articulation of who you are and how you're different.

Branding is not a logo. If you do not know how to communicate who you are to someone who cannot see, you're in trouble. You should sound different, act different, and feel different. Only then can you make a case for looking different.

read more

Before You Make a Logo

A frequently overlooked step that makes all the difference in creating a good logo.

1.21.2020

Gonna cut straight to the chase on this one: without a potent, different name for your startup, your logo will fall short of its true potential. I'll give you an example using two, famous companies.

Apple. Would the iconic, minimalist icon representing an apple ever exist had it not been for the name? No. That name gave them an advantage over their competitors trapped in acronym oblivion (IBM, HP) and inspired the mark.

Nike. Before the swoosh ever existed, Nike was extremely close to calling itself Blue Ribbon Sports. Compare that to Nike. Blue Ribbon sounds like the name for a freaking mom and pop bakery. There is no way something like the swoosh would have held its weight had it not been for the name it represents.

It seems prevalent that startup founders don't seem to consider the gravitas the name of their company holds. Think about it, when people say "word of mouth" advertising, what do they mean? They mean people repeat the name of the company they are referring to. Can you imagine how many times the name of a company (large or small) is used within six months? Thousands. Maybe even tens of thousands.

It's in your URL, it's on your social pages, it's on name tags, it's on email addresses, it's on all your marketing collateral, and it's on your tongue.

Get your name right before you jump into a logo or risk doing the whole thing over when you finally realize your name sucks. Your designer will thank you.

Here is my favorite book on naming:

Don't Call it That by Eli Altman.

read more