A Few of Their Favorite Things | Software Branding

Aligning your software brand with your most valued customers.

January 14, 2021

Chances are, your brand is already out in the world.

What? Yes! It is. Your brand is the emotional value people attribute to your company, value they already find in many other things throughout their day.

For example, if you want your brand to be seen as happy, joyful, youthful, and teeming zest for life, I bet your ideal users experience this in other places. Perhaps it's from an ice cream shop, a children's author, or a TV Show. The point is that somewhere out there is a prime example of these attributes. The same would be said of any other adjective as well: elite, progressive, friendly, serious, stoic, sarcastic, brave, funny, classic, you get the point.

Your job in building a brand for your most valued customers is to understand what emotions are missing from the market category you want to enter, research places these emotions are found within your customer's life, and steal the things that make them memorable.

Seriously, steal them. Steal the colors, steal the phrases, steal the pictures, steal the shapes, steal the experience as much as you can.

Why is this effective? Because you are taking something familiar and placing it into a new context. This is the recipe for novelty.

Happy stealing.

More you say?

The Overlap

Why you can't just build something for yourself.

4.6.2020

"Well, I'm my target market, so I should design a brand for myself."

I hear this a lot, especially from startup founders who think they have an amazing product that is going to solve world hunger and end war forever (I'm kidding, but you get the idea). However, despite the product being so amazing, they can't get sales, have a hard time pitching, and are constantly pivoting to the point of exhaustion. What's more, they all have shitty brands.

Why is that? Because going into business to build something for yourself is a surefire way to have an aimless brand, one that you cannot objectively validate. It's doomed from the start. Think about it, if you fully embody the exact persona of someone who could use your product, then they don't need you. They are able to solve this problem themselves. Good luck making them feel something other than contempt for you imposing yourself on their day-to-day.

I get it, you want to enjoy the work you do and have a brand that you can appreciate being a part of. You cannot find that focusing on yourself.

The key is to find overlap, a common thread between what your customers value and what you value. There is a reason they are listed in that order, as you, being an entrepreneur, can build a kickass business and brand whether you feel personally attached to it or not. You'll crush it because solving problems for other people is what you're best at, that is your job.

If you happen to have a passion for the brand and can align with it personally, all the better. But, you have to focus on a customer first or you have no business. Not only in the products you create, but the way you make them feel. That's where the branding magic is born.

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Coffee Filter

Why original ideas are not as good as stolen ideas.

5.6.2020

FYI, I stole this concept and story from Sprint by Jake Knapp, enjoy!

I don't drink coffee, but I'd imagine the most people wouldn't if they had to drink coffee without using coffee filters. You see, before the filter coffee was brewed the same way you'd steep a bag of tea. The result was a lot of over-brewed, grit filled, coffee. Gross.

Filters had been attempted before, but to no avail. They were made of cloth.

It wasn't until a woman named Melitta Bentz saw blotting paper on her son's desk that the idea for our modern filters came to her. Blotting paper was used to clean up excess ink , it was porous enough to let liquid pass, but not enough to let the gritty grounds come through. Sure enough, after using it in place of cloth, she was astounded. The flavor was great and clean up was a snap.

What does this have to do with branding?

Sometimes the obvious solution to your brand isn't where you'd expect. You won't find it looking at competitors or digging within the muck of your day-to-day, it's somewhere else. Perhaps it's a different industry, or in a game you used to play, your favorite movie, a song. Instead of trying to create the perfect brand, find it and repurpose it.

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